Fredrik Ekström

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Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) interfere with the catalytic mechanism of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by rapidly phosphorylating the catalytic serine residue. The inhibited enzyme can at least partly be reactivated with nucleophilic reactivators such as oximes. The covalently attached OP conjugate may undergo further intramolecular dealkylation or(More)
Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by organophosphorus compounds (OPs) such as pesticides and nerve agents causes acute toxicity or death of the intoxicated individual. The inhibited AChE may be reactivated by certain oximes as antidotes for clinical treatment of OP-intoxications. Crystal structures of the oximes HI-6, Ortho-7 and obidoxime in(More)
Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an essential enzyme that terminates cholinergic transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Compounds inhibiting this enzyme can be used (inter alia) to treat cholinergic deficiencies (e.g. in Alzheimer's disease), but may also act as dangerous toxins (e.g. nerve agents such as sarin). Treatment of(More)
Organophosphorus nerve agents interfere with cholinergic signaling by covalently binding to the active site of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). This inhibition causes an accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, potentially leading to overstimulation of the nervous system and death. Current treatments include the use of antidotes that(More)
Organophosphorus compounds (OPs), such as nerve agents and a group of insecticides, irreversibly inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by a rapid phosphorylation of the catalytic Ser203 residue. The formed AChE-OP conjugate subsequently undergoes an elimination reaction, termed aging, that results in an enzyme completely resistant to oxime-mediated(More)
Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) hydrolyzes or scavenges a wide range of toxic esters, including heroin, cocaine, carbamate pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, and nerve agents. Organophosphates (OPs) exert their acute toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by phosphorylation of the catalytic serine. Phosphylated cholinesterase(More)
The molecular interactions between the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and two compound classes consisting of N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]benzenesulfonamides and N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]benzenemethanesulfonamides have been investigated using organic synthesis, enzymatic assays, X-ray crystallography, and thermodynamic profiling. The inhibitors' aromatic(More)
Organophosphonates such as isopropyl metylphosphonofluoridate (sarin) are extremely toxic as they phosphonylate the catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme essential to humans and other species. Design of effective AChE reactivators as antidotes to various organophosphonates requires information on how the reactivators interact(More)
The nerve agent tabun inhibits the essential enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by a rapid phosphoramidation of the catalytic serine residue. Oximes, such as K027 and HLö-7, can reactivate tabun-inhibited human AChE (tabun-hAChE) whereas the activity of their close structural analogue HI-6 is notably low. To investigate HI-6, K027 and HLö-7, residues lining(More)
The therapeutic approach of organophosphorus compound (OP) intoxications is to reactivate the inhibited enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Numerous studies demonstrated a limited efficacy of standard oxime-based reactivators against different nerve agents such as tabun and cyclosarin. This emphasizes research for more effective oximes. In the present(More)