Frederick P. Ross

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While TNF-alpha is pivotal to the pathogenesis of inflammatory osteolysis, the means by which it recruits osteoclasts and promotes bone destruction are unknown. We find that a pure population of murine osteoclast precursors fails to undergo osteoclastogenesis when treated with TNF-alpha alone. In contrast, the cytokine dramatically stimulates(More)
Osteoclasts are the principal, if not exclusive, bone-resorbing cells, and their activity has a profound impact on skeletal health. So, disorders of skeletal insufficiency, such as osteoporosis, typically represent enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption relative to bone formation. Prevention of pathological bone loss therefore depends on an appreciation of(More)
TNF-induced receptor activator NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells is a fundamental component of inflammatory osteolysis. We found that this process was abolished by IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or in stromal cells derived from type I IL-1 receptor-deficient (IL-1RI-deficient) mice. Reflecting sequential signaling of the(More)
Postnatal bone marrow houses mesenchymal progenitor cells that are osteoblast precursors. These cells have established therapeutic potential, but they are difficult to maintain and expand in vitro, presumably because little is known about the mechanisms controlling their fate decisions. To investigate the potential role of Notch signaling in(More)
Osteoclasts express the alphavbeta3 integrin, an adhesion receptor that has been implicated in bone resorption and that is therefore a potential therapeutic target. To assess the role of this heterodimer in skeletal development in vivo, we engineered mice in which the gene for the beta3 integrin subunit was deleted. Bone marrow macrophages derived from(More)
beta3 integrins have been implicated in a wide variety of functions, including platelet aggregation and thrombosis (alphaIIbbeta3) and implantation, placentation, angiogenesis, bone remodeling, and tumor progression (alphavbeta3). The human bleeding disorder Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT) can result from defects in the genes for either the alphaIIb or the(More)
TNF-alpha is the dominant cytokine in inflammatory osteolysis. Using mice whose BM stromal cells and osteoclast precursors are chimeric for the presence of TNF receptors, we found that both cell types mediated the cytokine's osteoclastogenic properties. The greater contribution was made, however, by stromal cells that express the osteoclastogenic cytokine(More)
Osteoporosis is a frequent problem in disorders characterized by iron overload, such as the thalassemias and hereditary hemochromatosis. The exact role of iron in the development of osteoporosis in these disorders is not established. To define the effect of iron excess in bone, we generated an iron-overloaded mouse by injecting iron dextran at 2 doses into(More)
Accumulating evidence indicates that interaction of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12 [CXC motif, ligand 12]) with its cognate receptor, CXCR4 (CXC motif, receptor 4), generates signals that regulate hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) trafficking in the bone marrow. During granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-induced HPC mobilization,(More)
Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of(More)