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Transcription by RNA polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in humans is widespread, even in genomic regions that do not encode proteins. The purpose of such intergenic transcription is largely unknown, although it can be regulatory. We have discovered a role for one case of intergenic transcription by studying the S. cerevisiae SER3 gene. Our(More)
Genetic analysis has implicated SPT6, an essential gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the control of chromatin structure. Mutations in SPT6 and particular mutations in histone genes are able to overcome transcriptional defects in strains lacking the Snf/Swi protein complex. Here it is shown that an spt6 mutation causes changes in chromatin structure in(More)
RSC is an essential 15 protein nucleosome-remodeling complex from S. cerevisiae. We have identified two closely related RSC members, Rsc1 and Rsc2. Biochemical analysis revealed Rsc1 and Rsc2 in distinct complexes, defining two forms of RSC. Genetic analysis has shown that Rsc1 and Rsc2 possess shared and unique functions. Rsc1 and Rsc2 each contain two(More)
The transcription factors TFIID and SAGA are multi-subunit complexes involved in transcription by RNA polymerase II. TFIID and SAGA contain common TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (TAF(II)) subunits and each complex contains a subunit with histone acetyltransferase activity. These observations have raised questions about whether the functions of(More)
Previous studies have suggested that transcription elongation results in changes in chromatin structure. Here we present studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spt6, a conserved protein implicated in both transcription elongation and chromatin structure. Our results show that, surprisingly, an spt6 mutant permits aberrant transcription initiation from within(More)
Previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have demonstrated that cryptic promoters within coding regions activate transcription in particular mutants. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of cryptic transcription in order to identify factors that normally repress cryptic promoters, to determine the amount of cryptic transcription genome-wide, and(More)
The transposable Ty elements consist of a central core, epsilon, flanked by direct repeats called deltas. In wild-type strains Ty transcripts initiate in one delta and terminate in the other. Insertion mutations caused by Ty elements have a wide variety of phenotypes, ranging from inhibition of gene expression to constitutive gene expression. Mutations in(More)
SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes have crucial roles in transcription and other chromatin-related processes. The analysis of the two members of this class in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SWI/SNF and RSC, has heavily contributed to our understanding of these complexes. To understand the in vivo functions of SWI/SNF and RSC in an evolutionarily distant(More)
Proper histone levels are critical for transcription, chromosome segregation, and other chromatin-mediated processes(1-7). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histones H2A and H2B are encoded by two gene pairs, named HTA1-HTB1 and HTA2-HTB2 (ref. 8). Previous studies have demonstrated that when HTA2-HTB2 is deleted, HTA1-HTB1 dosage compensates at the(More)