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The magnitude of heat and salt transfer between the Indian and Atlantic oceans through 'Agulhas leakage' is considered important for balancing the global thermohaline circulation. Increases or reductions of this leakage lead to strengthening or weakening of the Atlantic meridional overturning and associated variation of North Atlantic Deep Water formation.(More)
About one third of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2) released into the atmosphere in the past two centuries has been taken up by the ocean. As CO 2 invades the surface ocean, carbonate ion concentrations and pH are lowered. Laboratory studies indicate that this reduces the calcifi-cation rates of marine calcifying organisms, including plank-tic(More)
The circulation of the deep Atlantic Ocean during the height of the last ice age appears to have been quite different from today. We review observations implying that Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum was neither extremely sluggish nor an enhanced version of present-day circulation. The distribution of the decay(More)
The oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifera tests is one of the widest used geochemical tools to reconstruct past changes of physical parameters of the upper ocean. It is common practice to analyze multiple individuals from a mono-specific population and assume that the outcome reflects a mean value of the environmental conditions during(More)
Fossils of marine microorganisms such as planktic foraminifera are among the cornerstones of palaeoclimatological studies. It is often assumed that the proxies derived from their shells represent ocean conditions above the location where they were deposited. Planktic foraminifera, however, are carried by ocean currents and, depending on the life traits of(More)
The Indian-Atlantic water exchange south of Africa (Agulhas leakage) is a key component of the global ocean circulation. No quantitative estimation of the paleo-Agulhas leakage exists. We quantify the variability in interocean exchange over the past 640,000 years, using planktic foraminiferal assemblage data from two marine sediment records to define an(More)
About one third of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2) released into the atmosphere in the past two centuries has been taken up by the ocean. As CO 2 invades the surface ocean, carbonate ion concentrations and pH are lowered. Laboratory studies indicate that this reduces the calcification rates of marine calcifying organisms, includ-5 ing planktic(More)
So-called " vital effects " are a collective term for a suite of physiologically and metabolically induced variability in oxygen (δ 18 O) and carbon (δ 13 C) isotope ratios of plank-tonic foraminifer shells that hamper precise quantitative reconstruction of past ocean parameters. Correction for potential isotopic offsets from equilibrium or the expected(More)
  • G Ganssen, F Peeters, +10 authors G.-J A Brummer
  • 2015
Copyright and Moral Rights for the articles on this site are retained by the individual authors and/or other copyright owners. For more information on Open Research Online's data policy on reuse of materials please consult the policies page. Abstract. The oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifera tests is one of the widest used geochemical(More)