Learn More
Quantification of cardiac chamber size, ventric-ular mass, and function ranks among the most clinically important and most frequently requested tasks of echocardiography. Standardization of chamber quantification has been an early concern in echocardiography and recommendations on how to measure such fundamental parameters are among the most often cited(More)
Continuing Medical Education Activity for " Recommendations for the Evaluation of Left Ventricular Diastolic Function by Echocardiography " Accreditation Statement: The American Society of Echocardiography is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Society(More)
The content of these European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines has been published for personal and educational use only. No commercial use is authorized. No part of the ESC Guidelines may be translated or reproduced in any form without written permission from the ESC. Permission can be obtained upon submission of a written request to Oxford University(More)
Ultrasound technology has improved markedly in the past 10 to 15 years, prompting echocardi-ographers to extend its use in studying cardiac structure and function. New ultrasound equipment and techniques offer superior image quality, greater accuracy, and expanding capabilities. As a result, more and improved imaging modalities are available for evaluating(More)
The ASE has gone green! Visit www.aseuniversity.org to earn free continuing medical education credit through an online activity related to this article. Certificates are available for immediate access upon successful completion of the activity. Nonmembers will need to join the ASE to access this great member benefit!
Embolism of cardiac origin accounts for around 15–30% of ischaemic strokes. Strokes due to cardioembolism are generally severe and early and long-term recurrence and mortality are high. The diagnosis of a cardioembolic source of stroke is frequently uncertain and relies on the identification of a potential cardiac source of embolism in the absence of(More)
Right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction are challenging to assess by echocardiography, but are well established as functional and prognostic parameters. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography has become widespread and relatively easy to use, making calculation of these parameters feasible in the large majority of patients. We review past attempts(More)
  • 1