Learn More
In this paper, we investigate the actual performance of some of the best known localization algorithms when deployed in real-world indoor environments. Among the plethora of possible localization schemes, we focus on those based on radio signal strength measurements only, since they do not require extra circuitry that would result in higher cost and energy(More)
This paper presents the localization of a mobile robot while simultaneously mapping the position of the nodes of aWireless Sensor Network using only range measurements. The robot can estimate the distance to nearby nodes of the Wireless Sensor Network by measuring the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) of the received radio messages. The RSSI measure(More)
— Energy–efficiency in underwater networks is a key issue that affects all aspects of network design, from hardware to protocols and applications. In this paper we analyze the impact of node density on the energy consumption in transmission, reception and idle–listening, in a network where nodes follow a duty cycle scheme. We consider the energy performance(More)
Enabling self-localization of mobile nodes is an important problem that has been widely studied in the literature. The general conclusions is that an accurate localization requires either sophisticated hardware (GPS, UWB, ultrasounds transceiver) or a dedicated infrastructure (GSM, WLAN). In this paper we tackle the problem from a different and rather new(More)
To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite (" gouge ") at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5(More)
With the increasing spread of use of mobile devices there is a growing demand for location-aware services in a wide variety of contexts. Yet providing an accurate location estimation is difficult when considering cheap off-the-shelf mobile devices, particularly in indoors or urban environments. In this paper we define and compare different localization(More)
In this paper we tackled the localization problem from an opportunistic perspective, according to which a node can infer its own spatial position by exchanging data with passing by nodes, called peers. We consider an opportunistic localization algorithm based on the linear matrix inequality (LMI) method coupled with a weighted barycenter algorithm. This(More)
Opportunistic localization is a new approach to the self-localization problem that is recognized as one of the most critical for mobile users, in particular in indoor environments. The basic idea consists in allowing mobile users to exchange location information when they happen to be in radio range and to exploit this information in order to improve the(More)
—Enabling self-localization of mobile nodes is an important problem that has been widely studied in the literature. The general conclusions is that an accurate localization requires either sophisticated hardware (GPS, UWB, ultrasounds transceiver) or a dedicated infrastructure (GSM, WLAN). In this paper we tackle the problem from a different and rather new(More)