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OBJECTIVES SCN1A mutations were recently reported in several patients with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI). The authors analyzed SCN1A mutations in 93 patients with SMEI and made genotype-phenotype correlation to clarify the role of this gene in the etiology of SMEI. METHODS All patients fulfilled the criteria for SMEI. The authors analyzed(More)
Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) is a motor neuron degenerative disease of unknown etiology. Current thinking on SALS is that multiple genetic and environmental factors contribute to disease liability. Since neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are part of the glutamatergic pathway, we searched for sequence variants in CHRNA3, CHRNA4 and(More)
Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a rare condition caused by mutations of the transthyretin (TTR) gene and it is generally characterized by a length-dependent polyneuropathy affecting prevalently the small fibers. We reviewed clinical, electrophysiological and pathological findings of 15 unrelated patients with genetically confirmed TTR-FAP. All(More)
PURPOSE The role of the familial background in severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) has been traditionally emphasized in literature, with 25-70% of the patients having a family history of febrile seizures (FS) or epilepsy. We explored the genetic background of SMEI patients carrying SCN1A mutations to further shed light on the genetics of this(More)
Idiopathic epilepsies (IEs) are a group of disorders characterized by recurrent seizures in the absence of detectable brain lesions or metabolic abnormalities. IEs include common disorders with a complex mode of inheritance and rare Mendelian traits suggesting the occurrence of several alleles with variable penetrance. We previously described a large family(More)
BACKGROUND Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) or Dravet syndrome has been long suspected of having a genetic origin. Recently, mutations in SCN1A and GABRG2 have been described in SMEI patients. The sporadic nature of the SMEI syndrome and the occurrence of SCN1A and GABRG2 mutations in a mild familial phenotype, termed generalized epilepsy with(More)
Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME or FAME) is an autosomal dominant condition, characterized by shivering-like tremors of cortical origin, myoclonus, and epilepsy. Linkage to chromosomes 2p11.1-q12.2 and 8q23.1-q24.11 has been reported in Japanese and Italian families, respectively. We aimed to determine whether a common founder haplotype was(More)
INTRODUCTION To determine the occurrence of neuroradiological abnormalities and to perform genotype-phenotype correlations in severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, Dravet syndrome). PATIENTS AND METHODS Alpha-subunit type A of voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) mutational screening was performed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography(More)
OBJECTIVE To identify cryptic chromosomal deletions involving SCN1A in patients with severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI). METHODS Thirty-nine patients with SMEI and without SCN1A point mutations and their parents were typed with 14 intragenic SCN1A polymorphisms to identify hemizygosity. The parental origin and the extent of genomic deletions were(More)
Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) has been long suspected to have a genetic origin. Recently mutations in the gene encoding a voltage-gated alpha-1 sodium channel subunit-SCN1A-have been identified as a common cause of SMEI. Moreover, a mutation in the gene encoding the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor-GABRG2-has been described in a GEFS+(More)