Fouad Abd-El-Khalick

Learn More
Improving science teachers' conceptions of nature of science: a critical review of the literature Fouad Abd-El-Khalick & Norman G. Lederman To cite this article: Fouad Abd-El-Khalick & Norman G. Lederman (2000) Improving science teachers' conceptions of nature of science: a critical review of the literature, International Journal of Science Education, 22:7,(More)
This study investigated the influence of an explicit and reflective inquiry-oriented compared with an implicit inquiry-oriented instructional approach on sixth graders’ understandings of nature of science (NOS). The study emphasized the tentative, empirical, inferential, and imaginative and creative NOS. Participants were 62 sixth-grade students in two(More)
This study (a) assessed the in ̄uence of three history of science (HOS) courses on college students' and preservice science teachers' conceptions of nature of science (NOS), (b) examined whether participants who entered the investigated courses with a conceptual framework consistent with contemporary NOS views achieved more elaborate NOS understandings, and(More)
This study assessed the influence of a reflective, explicit, activity-based approach to nature of science (NOS) instruction undertaken in the context of an elementary science methods course on preservice teachers’ views of some aspects of NOS. These aspects included the empirical, tentative, subjective (theory-laden), imaginative and creative, and social(More)
We use evidence from cognitive psychology and the history of science to examine the issue of the theory-ladenness of perceptual observation. This evidence shows that perception is theory-laden, but that it is only strongly theory-laden when the perceptual evidence is ambiguous or degraded, or when it requires a difficult perceptual judgment. We argue that(More)
This study examined the impact of two epistemic commitments on the quality of college students‟ scientific reasoning in the domain of hydrostatics. These were the commitment to the consistency of theory with prior knowledge and commitment to the consistency of theory with evidence. Participants were 12 sophomore science majors enrolled in a large Midwestern(More)
  • 1