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14-3-3 proteins are crucial in a wide variety of cellular responses including cell cycle progression, DNA damage checkpoints and apoptosis. One particular 14-3-3 isoform, sigma, is a p53-responsive gene, the function of which is frequently lost in human tumours, including breast and prostate cancers as a result of either hypermethylation of the 14-3-3sigma(More)
Cellular behavior in response to stimulatory cues is governed by information encoded within a complex intracellular signaling network. An understanding of how phenotype is determined requires the distributed characterization of signaling processes (e.g., phosphorylation states and kinase activities) in parallel with measures of resulting cell function. We(More)
DNA damage activates a signalling network that blocks cell-cycle progression, recruits DNA repair factors and/or triggers senescence or programmed cell death. Alterations in chromatin structure are implicated in the initiation and propagation of the DNA damage response. Here we further investigate the role of chromatin structure in the DNA damage response(More)
X chromosome inactivation (XCI) depends on the long noncoding RNA Xist and its recruitment of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 is also targeted to other sites throughout the genome to effect transcriptional repression. Using XCI as a model, we apply an unbiased proteomics approach to isolate Xist and PRC2 regulators and identified ATRX. ATRX(More)
Computational models are increasingly used to understand and predict complex biological phenomena. These models contain many unknown parameters, at least some of which are difficult to measure directly, and instead are estimated by fitting to time-course data. Previous work has suggested that even with precise data sets, many parameters are unknowable by(More)
During meiosis, cohesins--protein complexes that hold sister chromatids together--are lost from chromosomes in a step-wise manner. Loss of cohesins from chromosome arms is necessary for homologous chromosomes to segregate during meiosis I. Retention of cohesins around centromeres until meiosis II is required for the accurate segregation of sister(More)
Although human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression is implicated in tumor progression for a variety of cancer types, how it dysregulates signaling networks governing cell behavioral functions is poorly understood. To address this problem, we use quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze dynamic effects of HER2 overexpression on(More)
Systems biology, particularly of mammalian cells, is data starved. However, technologies are now in place to obtain rich data, in a form suitable for model construction and validation, that describes the activities, states and locations of cell-signalling molecules. The key is to use several measurement technologies simultaneously and, recognizing each of(More)
The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and is involved in a wide range of biological processes. Although MAPKs have been intensely studied, identification of their substrates remains challenging. We have optimized a chemical genetic system using(More)
Tumor cells often subvert normal regulatory mechanisms of signal transduction. This study shows this principle by studying yet uncharacterized mutants of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) previously identified in glioblastoma multiforme, which is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. Unlike the well-characterized EGFRvIII mutant form, which(More)