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Diacylglycerol (DAG) lipase activity is required for axonal growth during development and for retrograde synaptic signaling at mature synapses. This enzyme synthesizes the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is also required for the above responses. We now report on the cloning and enzymatic characterization of(More)
Endocannabinoids (eCBs) function as retrograde signaling molecules at synapses throughout the brain, regulate axonal growth and guidance during development, and drive adult neurogenesis. There remains a lack of genetic evidence as to the identity of the enzyme(s) responsible for the synthesis of eCBs in the brain. Diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLalpha) and(More)
The clinical use of anti-oestrogens in breast cancer therapy has traditionally been restricted to tumours that contain measurable oestrogen receptor protein. However, it is now widely recognised that the clinical response to adjuvant anti-oestrogen therapy appears to be independent of the oestrogen receptor content of the primary tumour. The study reported(More)
Endocannabinoids are small signaling lipids, with 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) implicated in modulating axonal growth and synaptic plasticity. The concept of short-range extracellular signaling by endocannabinoids is supported by the lack of trans-synaptic 2-AG signaling in mice lacking sn-1-diacylglycerol lipases (DAGLs), synthesizing 2-AG. Nevertheless,(More)
Diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DAGLα) generates the endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) that regulates the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells and serves as a retrograde signaling lipid at synapses. Nothing is known about the dynamics of DAGLα expression in cells and this is important as it will govern where 2-AG can be made(More)
Can governments improve aid programs by providing information to beneficiaries? In our model, information can change how much aid citizens receive as they bargain with local officials who implement national programs. In a large-scale field experiment, we test whether mailing cards with program information to beneficiaries increases their subsidy from a(More)
The views expressed in the HKS Faculty Research Working Paper Series are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of the John F. Kennedy School of Government or of Harvard University. Faculty Research Working Papers have not undergone formal review and approval. Such papers are included in this series to elicit feedback and to encourage(More)
Local officials in developing countries often exercise considerable discretion in implementing the central government's policies, resulting in changes in program functioning and, in some cases, outright theft. While providing information about their rights could empower eligible beneficiaries to demand more, we show in a simple dynamic bargaining model that(More)
This paper studies how governments can improve aid programs by providing information to beneficiaries. In our model, programs are administered by local officials, who bargain with recipients over how much the official will keep. We test how information affects the distribution of aid empirically through a large-scale, randomized field experiment in over 550(More)
  • Abhijit Banerjee, Rema Hanna, Jordan Kyle, Chaerudin Khadijah, Lina Kodir, Purwanto Marliani +11 others
  • 2014
This paper studies how governments can improve aid programs by providing information to beneficiaries. In our model, programs are administered by local officials, who bargain with recipients over how much the official will keep. We test how information affects the distribution of aid empirically through a large-scale, randomized field experiment in over 550(More)