Filippo Mantovani

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This paper describes JANUS, a modular massively parallel and reconfigurable FPGA-based computing system. Each JANUS module has a computational core and a host. The computational core is a 4x4 array of FPGA-based processing elements with nearest-neighbor data links. Processors are also directly connected to an I/O node attached to the JANUS host, a(More)
We describe the hardwired implementation of algorithms for Monte Carlo simulations of a large class of spin models. We have implemented these algorithms as VHDL codes and we have mapped them onto a dedicated processor based on a large FPGA device. The measured performance on one such processor is comparable to O(100) carefully programmed high-end PCs: it(More)
Dedicated machines designed for specific computational algorithms can outperform conventional computers by several orders of magnitude. In this note we describe Ianus, a new generation FPGA based machine and its basic features: hardware integration and wide reprogrammability. Our goal is to build a machine that can fully exploit the performance potential of(More)
We develop a Lattice Boltzmann code for computational fluid-dynamics and optimize it for massively parallel systems based on multi-core processors. Our code describes 2D multi-phase compressible flows. We analyze the performance bottlenecks that we find as we gradually expose a larger fraction of the available parallelism, and derive appropriate solutions.(More)
In this paper we present an implementation for the QPACE supercomputer of a Lattice Boltzmann model of a fluid-dynamics flow in 2 dimensions. QPACE is a massively parallel application-driven system powered by the Cell processor. We review the structure of the model, describe in details its implementation on QPACE and finally present performance data and(More)
This paper describes the architecture, the development and the implementation of Janus II, a new generation application-driven number cruncher optimized for Monte Carlo simulations of spin systems (mainly spin glasses). This domain of computational physics is a recognized grand challenge of high-performance computing: the resources necessary to study in(More)