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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) are neurodegenerative conditions that affect large motor neurons of the central nervous system. We have identified a familial juvenile PLS (JPLS) locus overlapping the previously identified ALS2 locus on chromosome 2q33. We report two deletion mutations in a new gene that are found both(More)
LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat protein kinase 2) is mutated in a significant number of Parkinson's disease patients. Since a common mutation that replaces Gly2019 with a serine residue enhances kinase catalytic activity, small-molecule LRRK2 inhibitors might have utility in treating Parkinson's disease. However, the effectiveness of inhibitors is difficult to(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7) is caused by the expansion of an unstable CAG repeat in the first exon of the SCA7 gene. We have analyzed the SCA7 mutation in 19 families and one isolated case of various geographical origins, presenting with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with progressive macular dystrophy. The SCA7 CAG repeat was expanded in 77(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is caused by the expansion of an unstable CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract. One hundred and eighty four index patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I were screened for this mutation. We found expansion in 109 patients from 30 families of different geographical origins (15%) and in two isolated cases(More)
BACKGROUND Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) is a clinically homogenous disorder reported in Quebec caused by mutations in the SACS gene (chromosome 13q12). Recently, we identified a Tunisian kindred demonstrating linkage to the ARSACS locus. OBJECTIVE To report clinical, neurophysiological, and nerve biopsy findings in(More)
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) usually presents as a sporadic disorder of motor neurons. However, familial forms of ALS have been described--autosomal dominant forms (ALS1, ALS3), clinically indistinguishable from the sporadic form, and autosomal recessive forms with early onset and slower progression of symptoms (ALS2). To localize the gene for one of(More)
Disorganization of the neurofilament network is a prominent feature of several neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), infantile spinal muscular atrophy and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN, MIM 256850), a severe, autosomal recessive sensorimotor neuropathy affecting both the peripheral(More)
Autosomal recessive familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (RFALS) is a rare form of ALS that usually presents at an early age with slow progression of symptoms. RFALS is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and the locus of RFALS type 3 was mapped to 2q33 (ALS2) in a single family. We now report linkage of a more-common form of RFALS to chromosome(More)
The diagnosis of rare inherited diseases is becoming more and more complex as an increasing number of clinical conditions appear to be genetically heterogeneous. Multigenic inheritance also applies to the autosomal recessive progressive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs), for which 14 genes have been identified and more are expected to be discovered. We used(More)
Autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia is genetically heterogeneous, with at least five loci identified by linkage analysis. Recently, mutations in spastin were identified in SPG4, the most common locus for dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia that was previously mapped to chromosome 2p22. We identified five novel mutations in the spastin gene(More)