Farhad Meshkati

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A game-theoretic model for studying power control in multicarrier code-division multiple-access systems is proposed. Power control is modeled as a noncooperative game in which each user decides how much power to transmit over each carrier to maximize its own utility. The utility function considered here measures the number of reliable bits transmitted over(More)
In this work, the cross-layer design problem of joint multiuser detection and power control is studied using a game-theoretic approach that focuses on energy efficiency. The uplink of a direct-sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) data network is considered and a non-cooperative game is proposed in which users in the network are allowed to choose(More)
This paper shows that game theory can be used as a unifying framework to study radio resource management in a variety of wireless networks. with different service criteria. It focuses on infrastructure networks where users transmit to a common concentration point such as a base station in a cellular network or an access point. Since most of the terminals in(More)
In the power control game proposed for MC-CDMA systems, each user needs to decide how much power to transmit over each carrier to maximize its overall utility. The utility function considered measures the number of reliable bits transmitted per joule of energy consumed. It is shown that the user's utility is maximized when the user transmits only on the(More)
A game-theoretic model is proposed to study the cross-layer problem of joint power and rate control with quality of service (QoS) constraints in multiple-access networks. In the proposed game, each user seeks to choose its transmit power and rate in a distributed manner in order to maximize its own utility while satisfying its QoS requirements. The user’s(More)
A game-theoretic approach for studying energy efficiency-delay tradeoffs in multiple-access networks is proposed. Focusing on the uplink of a code-division multiple-access (CDMA) network, a noncooperative game is considered in which each user seeks to choose a transmit power that maximizes its own utility while satisfying its (transmission) delay(More)
A game-theoretic model is proposed to study the cross-layer problem of joint power and rate control with quality of service (QoS) constraints in multiple-access networks. In the proposed game, each user seeks to choose its transmit power and rate in a distributed manner in order to maximize its own utility and at the same time satisfy its QoS requirements.(More)
A game-theoretic framework is used to study the effect of constellation size on the energy efficiency of wireless networks for M-QAM modulation. A non-cooperative game is proposed in which each user seeks to choose its transmit power (and possibly transmit symbol rate) as well as the constellation size in order to maximize its own utility while satisfying(More)
An overview of game-theoretic approaches to energy-efficient resource allocation in wireless networks is presented. Focusing on multiple-access networks, it is demonstrated that game theory can be used as an effective tool to study resource allocation in wireless networks with quality-of-service (QoS) constraints. A family of non-cooperative (distributed)(More)