Fabio Cerignoli

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Mutations of the ATM and NBS1 genes are responsible for the inherited Ataxia-Telangiectasia and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome, both of which are associated with a predisposition to cancer. A related syndrome, the Ataxia-Telangiectasia-like disorder, is due to mutations of the MRE11 gene. However, the role of this gene in cancer development has not been(More)
The notion that an increased expression of immediate early genes such as c-fos and c-jun is an absolute requirement for the G0-G1 transition of the hepatocytes has recently been challenged by the finding that rat liver cell proliferation induced by primary mitogens may occur in the absence of such changes (Columbano and Shinozuka, 1996). To further(More)
Frequent mutations of coding nucleotide repeats are thought to contribute significantly to carcinogenesis associated with microsatellite instability (MSI). We have shown that shortening of the poly(T)11 within the polypyrimidine stretch/accessory splicing signal of human MRE11 leads to the reduced expression and functional impairment of the MRE11/NBS1/RAD50(More)
The abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway is one of the most common findings in human cancer, and a number of molecular devices of laboratory and clinical relevance have been designed to block this transduction pathway. Because of the large number of cellular events that might be regulated through the activation of the four EGF(More)
High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural transcription factor and a putative protoncogene. Deregulation of its expression has been shown in most human cancers. We have previously shown that the expression of the HMGA family members is deregulated in neuroblastoma cell lines and primary tumors. On retinoic acid (RA) treatment of MYCN-amplified(More)
Vitamin A is required for a number of developmental processes and for the homeostatic maintenance of several adult differentiated tissues and organs. In human neuroblastoma (NB) cells as well as some other tumor types, pharmacological doses of retinoids are able to control growth and induce differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In a search for new genes(More)
Very soon after their original identification in HeLa cells in 1983, HMGA proteins appeared as interesting cancer-related molecules. Indeed, they were immediately noted as a sub-class of High Mobility Group proteins induced in fibroblast or epithelial cells transformed with sarcoma viruses. After more than 20 years, the association between HMGA protein(More)
HMGI and HMGY are splicing variants of the HMGI(Y) gene and together with HMGI-C, belong to a family of DNA binding proteins involved in maintaining active chromatin conformation and in the regulation of gene transcription. The expression of the HMGI(Y) gene is maximal during embryonic development, declines in adult differentiated tissues and is reactivated(More)
The high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins are thought to work as ancillary transcription factors and to regulate the expression of a growing number of genes through direct binding to DNA or via protein-protein interactions. Both HMGA1 and HMGA2 are important regulators of basic biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation and transformation.(More)
Vitamin A is required for a number of developmental processes and for the homeostatic maintenance of several adult differentiated tissues and organs. In human neuroblastoma (NB) cells as well as some other tumor types, pharmacological doses of retinoids are able to control growth and induce differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In a search for new genes(More)
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