Fabien Corbière

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In sheep, susceptibility to scrapie is mainly influenced by polymorphisms of the PrP gene. In goats, there are to date few data related to scrapie susceptibility association with PrP gene polymorphisms. In this study, we first investigated PrP gene polymorphisms of the French Alpine and Saanen breeds. Based on PrP gene open reading frame sequencing of(More)
Because variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans probably results from consumption of products contaminated with tissue from animals with bovine spongiform encephalopathy, whether infectious prion protein is present in ruminant muscles is a crucial question. Here we show that experimentally and naturally scrapie-affected sheep accumulate the prion(More)
The PrP gene polymorphisms at codons 142 (I/M), 154 (R/H), 211 (R/Q), 222 (Q/K) and 240 (S/P) and their association with susceptibility to classical scrapie infection were investigated in five French goat herds displaying a high disease prevalence (>10%). On the basis of PrP(Sc) detection in the central nervous system and in various lymphoid tissues, 301 of(More)
It is now clearly established that the transfusion of blood from variant CJD (v-CJD) infected individuals can transmit the disease. Since the number of asymptomatic infected donors remains unresolved, inter-individual v-CJD transmission through blood and blood derived products is a major public health concern. Current risk assessments for transmission of(More)
Placentae from scrapie-affected ewes are an important source of contamination. This study confirmed that scrapie-incubating ewes bearing susceptible genotypes could produce both abnormal prion protein (PrPSc)-positive and -negative placentae, depending only on the PRP genotype of the fetus. The results also provided evidence indicating that(More)
Atypical/Nor98 scrapie was first identified in 1998 in Norway. It is now considered as a worldwide disease of small ruminants and currently represents a significant part of the detected transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) cases in Europe. Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases were reported in ARR/ARR sheep, which are highly resistant to BSE and other(More)
Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected(More)
In goats, several field studies have identified coding mutations of the gene encoding the prion protein (I/M142, N/D146, S/D146, R/Q211, and Q/K222) that are associated with a lower risk of developing classical scrapie. However, the data related to the levels of resistance to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of these different PRNP gene(More)
Oral inoculation is currently considered as the best approach to mimic natural TSE contamination in ruminants. In this study, we compared the timing of abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) dissemination and accumulation in the organism of susceptible sheep either orally inoculated or naturally infected with classical scrapie. Both animal groups shared a similar(More)
Oral contamination with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in susceptible PRNP genotype sheep results in widespread distribution of prion in the host. Because ARR homozygous sheep are considered to be resistant to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, they have been selected to eradicate scrapie from sheep flocks and to protect the human food(More)