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Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
TLDR
Two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, are described that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo and confirm the distinctiveness of H.’shabilis and H.erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years. Expand
The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion
TLDR
Quantitative phylogenetically informed analysis of the radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals in 91 extant and recently extinct primate species and 119 other mammalian taxa provide support for the hypothesis that canal size varies in relation to the jerkiness of head motion during locomotion. Expand
New hominin genus from eastern Africa shows diverse middle Pliocene lineages
TLDR
New fossils discovered west of Lake Turkana, Kenya, which differ markedly from those of contemporary A. afarensis point to an early diet-driven adaptive radiation, provide new insight on the association of hominin craniodental features, and have implications for the understanding of Plio–Pleistocene hom inin phylogeny. Expand
Comparative review of the human bony labyrinth.
TLDR
This review compares the bony labyrinth of humans with that of the great apes and 37 other primate species based on data newly acquired with computed tomography combined with previous descriptions, finding that labyrinthine and basicranial shape are interspecifically correlated in the sample, and in most respects the human morphology is consistent with the general trend among primates. Expand
A juvenile early hominin skeleton from Dikika, Ethiopia
TLDR
The foot and other evidence from the lower limb provide clear evidence for bipedal locomotion, but the gorilla-like scapula and long and curved manual phalanges raise new questions about the importance of arboreal behaviour in the A. afarensis locomotor repertoire. Expand
Vestibular evidence for the evolution of aquatic behaviour in early cetaceans
TLDR
It is hypothesized that the unparalleled modification of the semicircular canal system represented a key ‘point of no return’ event in early cetacean evolution, leading to full independence from life on land. Expand
The bony labyrinth of Neanderthals.
TLDR
The typical shape of the Neanderthal labyrinth appears to mirror aspects of the surrounding petrous pyramid, and both may follow from the phylogenetic impact of Neanderthal brain morphology moulding the shape ofthe posterior cranial fossa. Expand
Implications of early hominid labyrinthine morphology for evolution of human bipedal locomotion
TLDR
A systematic attempt to reconstruct the locomotor behaviour of early hominids by looking at a major component of the mechanism for the unconscious perception of movement, namely by examining the vestibular system of living primates and earlyhominids. Expand
Climate-related variation of the human nasal cavity.
TLDR
The observed climate-related shape changes are functionally consistent with an increase in contact between air and mucosal tissue in cold-dry climates through greater turbulence during inspiration and a higher surface-to-volume ratio in the upper nasal cavity. Expand
Semicircular canal system in early primates.
TLDR
Fossil primates reconstructed are reconstructed as having been similarly agile to omomyids and derived notharctid adapoids, which suggests that when postcranial material is found for this species it will exhibit features for some leaping behaviour, or for a locomotor mode requiring a similar degree of agility. Expand
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