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The current state of insect molecular systematics: a thriving Tower of Babel.
TLDR
The cytochrome oxidase I, 16S, 18S, and elongation factor-1 alpha genes have been widely used and are informative across a broad range of divergences in insects, and their use as standards for insect phylogenetics is advocated.
A DNA-based approach to the identification of insect species used for postmortem interval estimation.
TLDR
This work sequenced 2300 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from each of three blowfly species, finding abundant DNA sequence differences that can unambiguously identify the immature larval stages of these insects.
DNA-based identification and molecular systematics of forensically important Sarcophagidae (Diptera).
TLDR
A database of mitochondrial DNA sequence data is developed that makes it possible to identify all sarcophagid species likely to be found feeding on a human corpse at an urban location in Canada or the USA.
DNA-based identification of forensically important Chrysomyinae (Diptera: Calliphoridae).
TLDR
A method for using mitochondrial DNA sequence data and phylogenetic analysis to identify any specimen of the blow fly subfamily Chrysomyinae likely to be collected from a human corpse within Canada or the USA is demonstrated.
Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in the spruce budworm species complex (Choristoneura: Lepidoptera).
TLDR
The potential utility of direct DNA sequencing in assessing population structures, species limits, and phylogenetic relationships among organisms that have not previously been subjected to DNA analysis is illustrated.
Papilio phylogeny based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I and II genes.
TLDR
These two protein coding genes, particularly COI, show excellent performance in resolving relationships at the level of species and species groups among Papilionidae and are strongly endorsed for future studies aimed at these levels.
A partitioned likelihood analysis of swallowtail butterfly phylogeny (Lepidoptera:Papilionidae).
TLDR
This work explored the use of partitioned, model-based analyses of heterogeneous molecular data in the context of a phylogenetic study of swallowtail butterflies, finding the most likely rooting is within the Papilioninae, although a rooting between Baronia and the remaining Papilionidae is only nonsignificantly less likely.
Interaction of process partitions in phylogenetic analysis: an example from the swallowtail butterfly genus Papilio.
TLDR
Although the mitochondrial and nuclear data were not significantly incongruent, homoplasy in the fast-evolving mitochondrial data confounded the resolution of basal relationships in the combined unweighted parsimony analysis despite the fact that there was relatively strong support for the relationships inThe nuclear data.
Sex-linked genes and species differences in Lepidoptera
TLDR
In the six best-studied species complexes, more than half of all ecological, behavioral, or physiological differences among species are controlled by X-links, indicating strong bias toward X-linkage of genes for species differences.
Evolution of the Papilio machaon species group in western Canada (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae)
TLDR
The P. machaon group includes a wide variety of populations associated with different foodplant, habitat and climate conditions, and the genetic versatility of the group leads either to ecological divergence between populations, or to localized genetic merging.
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