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African great apes are natural hosts of multiple related malaria species, including Plasmodium falciparum
Plasmodium reichenowi, a chimpanzee parasite, was until very recently the only known close relative of Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent agent of human malaria. Recently, Plasmodium gaboni,Expand
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Manipulation of host behaviour by parasites: ecosystem engineering in the intertidal zone?
Understanding the influence of parasites on the community ecology of free–living organisms is an emerging theme in ecology. The cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi is an abundant mollusc inhabiting theExpand
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Understanding parasite strategies: a state-dependent approach?
Understanding and predicting parasite strategies is of interest not only for parasitologists, but also for anyone interested in epidemiology, control strategies and evolutionary medicine. From anExpand
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Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts
Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to humanExpand
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Meager genetic variability of the human malaria agent Plasmodium vivax.
Malaria is a major human parasitic disease caused by four species of Plasmodium protozoa. Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread, affects millions of people across Africa, Asia, the Middle East, andExpand
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GENETIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL HETEROGENEITY IN SMALL RODENT WHIPWORMS IN SOUTHWESTERN EUROPE: CHARACTERIZATION OF TRICHURIS MURIS AND DESCRIPTION OF TRICHURIS ARVICOLAE N. SP. (NEMATODA: TRICHURIDAE)
Genetic and morphological variability of whipworms Trichuris Roederer, 1761 (Nematoda: Trichuridae), parasites of small rodents in southwestern Europe, was studied. Isozyme patterns of naturalExpand
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A New Malaria Agent in African Hominids
Plasmodium falciparum is the major human malaria agent responsible for 200 to 300 million infections and one to three million deaths annually, mainly among African infants. The origin and evolutionExpand
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African monkeys are infected by Plasmodium falciparum nonhuman primate-specific strains
Recent molecular exploration of the Plasmodium species circulating in great apes in Africa has revealed the existence of a large and previously unknown diversity of Plasmodium. For instance, gorillasExpand
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The Chikungunya threat: an ecological and evolutionary perspective.
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus. Although primarily African and zoonotic, it is known chiefly for its non-African large urban outbreaks during which it isExpand
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A Fresh Look at the Origin of Plasmodium falciparum, the Most Malignant Malaria Agent
From which host did the most malignant human malaria come: birds, primates, or rodents? When did the transfer occur? Over the last half century, these have been some of the questions up for debateExpand
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