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Direct Reference: From Language to Thought.
Preface. Part I: Direct Reference in Language and Thought. I.1 De re Communication. 1. Direct Reference and Linguistic Meaning: Rigidity de jure. . 2. Singular Propositions and Thoughts. 3. TheExpand
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The Pragmatics of What is Said
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1 Literal Meaning
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Truth-Conditional Pragmatics
Introduction 1. Compositionality, Flexibility, and Context-Dependence 2. Adjectives: A Case Study 3. Weather Reports 4. Pragmatics and Logical Form 5. Embedded Implicatures 6. Indexicality andExpand
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What Is Said
TLDR
We have the distinction between what is actually said and what is merely ‘conveyed’ by the utterance.Anyone who has reflected on the sentence meaning/utterance meaning distinction knows that a simple distinction is in fact insufficient. Expand
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The Alleged Priority of Literal Interpretation
TLDR
In this article, I argue against a widely accepted model of utterance interpretation, namely the LS model (literality-based serial model), according to which the literal interpretation of an utterance (the proposition literally expressed by that utterance) must be computed before nonliteral interpretations can be entertained. Expand
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Unarticulated Constituents
In a recent paper (Linguistics and Philosophy23, 4, June 2000), Jason Stanley argues that there are no `unarticulated constituents', contrary to what advocates of Truth-conditional pragmatics (TCP)Expand
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Perspectival Thought: A Plea for Moderate Relativism
PART 1 : MODERATE RELATIVISM 1. THE FRAMEWORK 2. THE DEBATE OVER TEMPORALISM (1) : DO WE NEED TEMPORAL PROPOSITIONS? 3. THE DEBATE OVER TEMPORALISM (2) : CAN WE BELIEVE TEMPORAL PROPOSITIONS ? 4.Expand
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Communication et cognition
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