• Publications
  • Influence
Phenotypic plasticity and the possible role of genetic assimilation: Hypoxia‐induced trade‐offs in the morphological traits of an African cichlid
In this study we investigate the possible role of phenotypic plasticity and genetic assimilation in the process of adaptation and evolutionary change in the cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolorExpand
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Why do almost all mammals have seven cervical vertebrae? Developmental constraints, Hox genes, and cancer.
  • F. Galis
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Journal of experimental zoology
  • 15 April 1999
Mammals have seven cervical vertebrae, a number that remains remarkably constant. I propose that the lack of variation is caused by developmental constraints: to wit, changes in Hox gene expression,Expand
  • 207
  • 11
  • Open Access
Testing the vulnerability of the phylotypic stage: on modularity and evolutionary conservation.
  • F. Galis, J. Metz
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The Journal of experimental zoology
  • 15 August 2001
The phylotypic stage is the developmental stage at which vertebrates most resemble each other. In this study we test the plausibility of the hypotheses of Sander [1983, Development and Evolution,Expand
  • 126
  • 10
  • Open Access
Why five fingers? Evolutionary constraints on digit numbers
Evolutionary changes in the number of digits and other limb elements appear to be severely constrained, probably as a result of a low level of modularity during limb development. Reduced limbExpand
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  • 7
  • Open Access
EXTREME SELECTION IN HUMANS AGAINST HOMEOTIC TRANSFORMATIONS OF CERVICAL VERTEBRAE
Abstract Why do all mammals, except for sloths and manatees, have exactly seven cervical vertebrae? In other vertebrates and other regions, the vertebral number varies considerably. We investigatedExpand
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  • Open Access
An old controversy solved: bird embryos have five fingers
Abstract New studies by Larsson and Wager, and by Feduccia and Nowicki of the embryogenesis of birds undisputedly show Anlagen for five fingers. This has important implications. First, the earlyExpand
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  • 6
  • Open Access
Sexual Dimorphism in the Prenatal Digit Ratio (2D:4D)
The second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) is smaller in human males than in females and hence this trait is sexually dimorphic. The digit ratio is thought to be established during early prenatalExpand
  • 178
  • 5
  • Open Access
Do large dogs die young?
In most animal taxa, longevity increases with body size across species, as predicted by the oxidative stress theory of aging. In contrast, in within-species comparisons of mammals and especiallyExpand
  • 75
  • 5
  • Open Access
Developmental Plasticity, Genetic Differentiation, and Hypoxia-induced Trade-offs in an African Cichlid Fish
In this study we explore the possible role of phenotypic plasticity in the process of adaptation and evolutionary change in the African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae. Parental fishExpand
  • 76
  • 5
  • Open Access
Evo-Devo of the Human Vertebral Column: On Homeotic Transformations, Pathologies and Prenatal Selection
Homeotic transformations of vertebrae are particularly common in humans and tend to come associated with malformations in a wide variety of organ systems. In a dataset of 1,389 deceased humanExpand
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