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Putting the altruism back into altruism: the evolution of empathy.
TLDR
Empathy is an ideal candidate mechanism to underlie so-called directed altruism, i.e., altruism in response to anothers's pain, need, or distress, and the dynamics of the empathy mechanism agree with predictions from kin selection and reciprocal altruism theory. Expand
Empathy: Its ultimate and proximate bases.
TLDR
The Perception-Action Model (PAM), together with an understanding of how representations change with experience, can explain the major empirical effects in the literature and can also predict a variety of empathy disorders. Expand
Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents
TLDR
Empirical evidence is provided that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Expand
Self-recognition in an Asian elephant
TLDR
A successful MSR elephant study is reported and striking parallels in the progression of responses to mirrors among apes, dolphins, and elephants are reported to suggest convergent cognitive evolution most likely related to complex sociality and cooperation. Expand
Giving is self-rewarding for monkeys
TLDR
Under certain conditions, delivering benefits to others seems gratifying to nonhuman primates, and monkeys understood the options and systematically favored the prosocial option. Expand
Spontaneous prosocial choice by chimpanzees
TLDR
Findings of a paradigm in which chimpanzees chose between two differently colored tokens draw into question previous conclusions indicating that chimpanzees have a limited sensitivity to the needs of others and behave prosocially only in response to significant prompting. Expand
Tolerance for inequity may increase with social closeness in chimpanzees
TLDR
It is demonstrated that, like capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees show a response to inequity of rewards that is based upon the partner receiving the reward rather than the presence of the reward alone. Expand
Recognizing facial cues: individual discrimination by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).
TLDR
Chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys are able to use facial cues to discriminate unfamiliar conspecifics and the feature-masking task showed that the eyes were the most important cue for individual recognition. Expand
Toward a comparative socioecology of the genus Macaca: Different dominance styles in rhesus and stumptail monkeys
TLDR
Comparisons with a second rhesus group, and with published reports, suggest that while some of the observed differences are probably representative of the two species, considerable intraspecific variation does exist, and a more comprehensive program of comparative studies is needed. Expand
The integration of dominance and social bonding in primates.
TLDR
Observations demonstrate that relationships among adult male chimpanzees cannot be described in terms of a dichotomy between affiliative and antagonistic tendencies, and that male bonding in this species has not been achieved by an elimination of aggression, but by a set of powerful buffering mechanisms that mitigate its effects. Expand
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