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Functioning of mycorrhizal associations along the mutualism–parasitism continuum*
TLDR
A greater understanding of how mycorrhizas function in complex natural systems is a prerequisite to managing them in agriculture, forestry, and restoration. Expand
Roles of arbuscular mycorrhizas in plant nutrition and growth: new paradigms from cellular to ecosystem scales.
TLDR
New physiological and molecular evidence shows that for phosphorus the mycorrhizal pathway (MP) is operational regardless of plant growth responses (positive or negative) and has important implications for consideration of AM symbioses in ecological, agronomic, and evolutionary contexts. Expand
Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas in Plant Phosphorus Nutrition: Interactions between Pathways of Phosphorus Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots Have Important Implications for Understanding and
TLDR
This finding demonstrates that the direct pathway delivers less P to AM plants than to NM counterparts and implies fungus-to-plant signaling, which helps to explain the persistence of AM symbiosis over evolutionary time, even in plants that apparently show no benefits. Expand
Plant and microbial strategies to improve the phosphorus efficiency of agriculture
TLDR
Evidence that more P-efficient plants can be developed by modifying root growth and architecture, through manipulation of root exudates or by managing plant-microbial associations such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and microbial inoculants is critically reviewed. Expand
Structural diversity in (vesicular)-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses.
TLDR
It is concluded that when considering the physiology of the symbiosis and especially the issue of whether different fungus/host interfaces have specialized roles in transfer of inorganic nutrients and organic carbon between the partners, if there is no such specialization between hyphai coils and arbuscules, then the latter might not be necessary for the function of Paris-types. Expand
Do iron plaque and genotypes affect arsenate uptake and translocation by rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) grown in solution culture?
TLDR
The results suggest that iron plaque may act as a 'buffer' for As in the rhizosphere as well as the differences between genotypes on arsenate uptake by and translocation within rice seedlings grown in nutrient solution in the greenhouse. Expand
Functional diversity in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses: the contribution of the mycorrhizal P uptake pathway is not correlated with mycorrhizal responses in growth or total P uptake
TLDR
AM colonisation can result in complete inactivation of the direct P uptake pathway via root hairs and epidermis; calculations of AM contributions to P uptake from total plant P will often be highly inaccurate; and lack of plant responsiveness does not mean that an AM fungus makes no contribution toP uptake. Expand
Arsenic sequestration in iron plaque, its accumulation and speciation in mature rice plants (Oryza sativa L.).
TLDR
There was significant variation in iron plaque formation between genotypes, and the distribution of arsenic in different components of mature rice plants followed the following order: iron plaque > root > straw > husk > grain for all genotypes. Expand
Do phosphorus nutrition and iron plaque alter arsenate (As) uptake by rice seedlings in hydroponic culture
TLDR
Values for the total uptake of As show that As in –P rice plants was mainly concentrated in the DCB-extracts or on the surface of rice roots, whereas most arsenic in +P plants was accumulated in the roots, indicating that iron plaque might sequestrate As, and consequently reduce the translocation of arsenic from roots to shoots. Expand
Mycorrhizal Fungi Can Dominate Phosphate Supply to Plants Irrespective of Growth Responses1
TLDR
Novel data is presented showing that AM fungi can form mutually beneficial symbioses with the roots of vascular plants and often increasing phosphate uptake and growth. Expand
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