• Publications
  • Influence
Learning to Lie: Effects of Practice on the Cognitive Cost of Lying
Cognitive theories on deception posit that lying requires more cognitive resources than telling the truth. In line with this idea, it has been demonstrated that deceptive responses are typicallyExpand
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  • Open Access
Lying relies on the truth
Cognitive models of deception focus on the conflict-inducing nature of the truth activation during lying. Here we tested the counterintuitive hypothesis that the truth can also serve a functionalExpand
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Lie, truth, lie: the role of task switching in a deception context
A cornerstone of the task switching literature is the finding that task performance is typically slower and more error-prone when the task switches than when it repeats. So far, deception researchExpand
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  • Open Access
From junior to senior Pinocchio: A cross-sectional lifespan investigation of deception.
We present the first study to map deception across the entire lifespan. Specifically, we investigated age-related difference in lying proficiency and lying frequency. A large community sample (n =Expand
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  • Open Access
Suppressing the truth as a mechanism of deception: Delta plots reveal the role of response inhibition in lying
Lying takes more time than telling the truth. Because lying involves withholding the truth, this "lie effect" has been related to response inhibition. We investigated the response inhibitionExpand
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When deception becomes easy: the effects of task switching and goal neglect on the truth proportion effect
Lying is typically more cognitively demanding than truth telling. Yet, recent cognitive models of lying propose that lying can be just as easy as truth telling, depending on contextual factors. InExpand
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  • Open Access
Lying and executive control: an experimental investigation using ego depletion and goal neglect.
This study investigated whether lying requires executive control using a reaction-time based lie test. We hypothesized that (1) goal neglect induced by a long response-stimulus interval (RSI; 5-8s)Expand
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  • Open Access
Detecting deception through reaction times
Reaction times (RTs) are among the oldest measures in psychology, and remain popular in several psychology disciplines. However, they have been largely neglected as a cue for deception, reflectingExpand
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In vino veritas? Alcohol, response inhibition and lying.
AIMS Despite the widespread belief that alcohol makes the truth come out more easily, we know very little on how alcohol impacts deception. Given that alcohol impairs response inhibition, and thatExpand
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  • Open Access