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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating progressive neurodegenerative disorder that ultimately leads to the patient's death. Despite the fact that novel pharmacological approaches endeavoring to block the neurodegenerative process are still emerging, none of them have reached use in clinical practice yet. Thus, palliative treatment represented by(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder. Several hallmarks such as β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation underlying amyloid plaque formation, τ-hyperphosphorylation leading to production of neurofibrillary tangles, and decline in the number of cholinergic neurons appear to be fundamental in the pathophysiology of the disease. Other(More)
A novel series of 6-chlorotacrine-scutellarin hybrids was designed, synthesized and the biological activity as potential anti-Alzheimer's agents was assessed. Their inhibitory activity towards human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE), antioxidant activity, ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and hepatotoxic(More)
Current options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment are based on administration of cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) and/or memantine, acting as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Therapeutic approaches vary and include novel cholinesterase inhibitors, modulators of NMDA receptors, monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors,(More)
Tacrine (THA), the first clinically effective acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor and the first approved drug for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), was withdrawn from the market due to its side effects, particularly its hepatotoxicity. Nowadays, THA serves as a valuable scaffold for the design of novel agents potentially applicable for AD(More)
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