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Autophagy, the lysosome-mediated self-degradation process, is implicated in survival during starvation in yeast, Dictyostelium and animals. In these eukaryotic taxa (collectively called Unikonts), autophagy is induced primarily through the Atg1/ULK1 complex in response to nutrient depletion. Autophagy has also been well-studied in non-unikont parasites,(More)
Boolean analysis (or BOOL-AN; Jakó et al., 2009. BOOL-AN: A method for comparative sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 52, 887-97.), a recently developed method for sequence comparison uses the Iterative Canonical Form of Boolean functions. It considers sequence information in a way entirely different from standard(More)
Hox genes play a central role in axial patterning during animal development. They are clustered in the genome and specify cell fate in sequential domains along the anteroposterior (A-P) body axis in a conserved order that is co-linear with their relative genomic position. In the soil worm Caenorhabditis elegans, this striking rule of co-linearity is broken(More)
Autophagy (cellular self-eating) is a highly regulated degradation process of the eukaryotic cell during which parts of the cytoplasm are delivered into, and broken down within, the lysosomal compartment. The process serves as a main route for the elimination of superfluous and damaged cellular constituents, thereby mediating macromolecular and organellar(More)
A novel discrete mathematical approach is proposed as an additional tool for molecular systematics which does not require prior statistical assumptions concerning the evolutionary process. The method is based on algorithms generating mathematical representations directly from DNA/RNA or protein sequences, followed by the output of numerical (scalar or(More)
Biomarkers with high reproducibility and accurate prediction performance can contribute to comprehending the underlying pathogenesis of related complex diseases and further facilitate disease diagnosis and therapy. Techniques integrating gene expression profiles and biological networks for the identification of network-based disease biomarkers are receiving(More)
Extensive cross-talk between signaling pathways is required to integrate the myriad of extracellular signal combinations at the cellular level. Gene duplication events may lead to the emergence of novel functions, leaving groups of similar genes - termed paralogs - in the genome. To distinguish critical paralog groups (CPGs) from other paralogs in human(More)
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