Esther M. Sternberg

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The central nervous system (CNS) regulates innate immune responses through hormonal and neuronal routes. The neuroendocrine stress response and the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems generally inhibit innate immune responses at systemic and regional levels, whereas the peripheral nervous system tends to amplify local innate immune responses.(More)
The autonomic nervous system (ANS) plays a role in a wide range of somatic and mental diseases. Whereas the role of the ANS in the regulation of the cardiovascular system seems evident, its role in the regulation of other systems associated with allostasis is less clear. Using a model of neurovisceral integration we describe how the ANS and parasympathetic(More)
A reciprocal regulation exists between the central nervous and immune systems through which the CNS signals the immune system via hormonal and neuronal pathways and the immune system signals the CNS through cytokines. The primary hormonal pathway by which the CNS regulates the immune system is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, through the hormones of(More)
We have recently found that susceptibility to streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats is due, in part, to defective inflammatory and stress mediator-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Conversely, the relative arthritis resistance of histocompatible Fischer (F344/N) rats is related to their(More)
Inbred Lewis (LEW/N) female rats develop an arthritis in response to group A streptococcal cell wall peptidoglycan polysaccharide (SCW), which mimics human rheumatoid arthritis. Histocompatible Fischer (F344/N) rats do not develop arthritis in response to the same SCW stimulus. To evaluate this difference in inflammatory reactivity, we examined the function(More)
Inflammation and inflammatory responses are modulated by a bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune system. Many lines of research have established the numerous routes by which the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) communicate. The CNS signals the immune system through hormonal pathways, including the(More)
Previous research has shown that infants who display a high frequency of motor activity and negative affect at 4 months of age are likely to be behaviorally inhibited toddlers. We examined social behaviors, maternal report of temperament, salivary cortisol, and baseline startle responses at age 4 in a sample of children, some of whom displayed a high(More)
Many lines of research have established the numerous routes by which the immune and central nervous systems (CNS) communicate. The CNS signals the immune system via hormonal and neuronal pathways and the immune system signals the CNS through similar routes via immune mediators and cytokines. The primary hormonal pathway by which the CNS regulates the immune(More)
Enhanced susceptibility to inflammatory and autoimmune disease can be related to impairments in HPA axis activity and associated hypocortisolism, or to glucocorticoid resistance resulting from impairments in local factors affecting glucocorticoid availability and function, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The enhanced inflammation and(More)
We have recently shown that susceptibility to streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats is related to a lack of glucocorticoid restraint of inflammation while the relative SCW arthritis resistance in histocompatible Fischer (F344/N) rats is related to their greater hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response. The(More)