Esrat Jahan

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Jaw movement affects masticatory muscles during the postnatal period. Prenatal jaw movement has also been implicated in the development of the temporomandibular joint; however, its effect on prenatal development of the masticatory muscles has not been extensively analysed. In the present study, we examined the effects of the restriction of fetal jaw(More)
Prenatal development of the mandible is an important factor in its postnatal function. To examine quantitatively normal and abnormal developmental changes of the mandible, we here evaluated morphological changes in mineralizing mandibles by thin-plate spline (TPS) including bending energy (BE) and Procrustes distance (PD), and by Procrustes analyses(More)
OBJECTIVE Jaw movement is an important mechanical factor for prenatal development of the condylar cartilage of mandible. Fetal jaw movement restriction has been shown to cause deformity of the mandibular condyle. We hypothesized that this treatment affects the expression of mechanosensitive molecules, namely Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and Parathyroid hormone(More)
Enchondral ossification is a fundamental mechanism for longitudinal bone growth during vertebrate development. In vitro studies suggested that functional blockade with RGD peptides or with an antibody that interferes with integrin α5β1-ligand interactions inhibited pre-hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation. The purpose of this study is to elucidate in(More)
Interkinetic nuclear migration (INM) is a phenomenon in which progenitor cell nuclei migrate along the apico-basal axis of the pseudostratified epithelium, which is characterized by the presence of apical primary cilia, in synchrony with the cell cycle in a manner of apical mitosis. INM is suggested to regulate not only stem/progenitor cell(More)
Interkinetic nuclear migration (INM) is a cell polarity-based phenomenon in which progenitor cell nuclei migrate along the apico-basal axis of the pseudostratified epithelium in synchrony with the cell cycle. INM is suggested to be at least partially cytoskeleton-dependent and to regulate not only the proliferation/differentiation of stem/progenitor cells(More)
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