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Legumes establish mutualistic associations with mycorrhizal fungi and with nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. These interactions occur following plant recognition of Nod factor from rhizobial bacteria and Myc factor from mycorrhizal fungi. A common symbiosis signaling pathway is involved in the recognition of both Nod factor and Myc factor and is required(More)
The symbiotic association between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is almost ubiquitous within the plant kingdom, and the early stages of the association are controlled by plant-derived strigolactones acting as a signal to the fungus in the rhizosphere and lipochito-oligosaccharides acting as fungal signals to the plant. Hyphopodia form at the root(More)
BACKGROUND Various evolutionary models have been proposed to interpret the fate of paralogous duplicates, which provides substrates on which evolution selection could act. In particular, domestication, as a special selection, has played important role in crop cultivation with divergence of many genes controlling important agronomic traits. Recent studies(More)
Legumes form symbiotic associations with either nitrogen-fixing bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Formation of these two symbioses is regulated by a common set of signalling components that act downstream of recognition of rhizobia or mycorrhizae by host plants. Central to these pathways is the calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase(More)
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