Erik D Roberson

Learn More
The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) performed a genome-wide association study of late-onset Alzheimer disease using a three-stage design consisting of a discovery stage (stage 1) and two replication stages (stages 2 and 3). Both joint analysis and meta-analysis approaches were used. We obtained genome-wide significant results at MS4A4A(More)
Many potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease target amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta), which are widely presumed to cause the disease. The microtubule-associated protein tau is also involved in the disease, but it is unclear whether treatments aimed at tau could block Abeta-induced cognitive impairments. Here, we found that reducing endogenous tau levels(More)
Neural network dysfunction may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuronal circuits vulnerable to AD are also affected in human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) transgenic mice. hAPP mice with high levels of amyloid-beta peptides in the brain develop AD-like abnormalities, including cognitive deficits and depletions of calcium-related(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) may result from the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides in the brain. The cysteine protease cathepsin B (CatB) is associated with amyloid plaques in AD brains and has been suspected to increase Abeta production. Here, we demonstrate that CatB actually reduces levels of Abeta peptides, especially the aggregation-prone(More)
This week marks a century since the first description of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite approval of several drugs for AD, the disease continues to rob millions of their memories and their lives. Fortunately, many new therapies directly targeting the mechanisms underlying AD are now in the pipeline. Among the investigative AD therapies in clinical trials(More)
BACKGROUND Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a common cause of non-Alzheimer dementia, but its natural history and the factors related to mortality in affected patients are not well understood. METHODS This retrospective, longitudinal study compared survival in FTLD (n = 177) with Alzheimer disease (AD; n = 395). Hazards analysis investigated(More)
BACKGROUND Until recently, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) was considered a rare neurodegenerative disorder that was difficult to diagnose. The publication of consensus criteria for FTLD, however, prompted systematic studies. The criteria categorize FTLD into 3 subgroups: frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, and progressive nonfluent(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder, is a growing public health problem and still lacks effective treatments. Recent evidence suggests that microtubule-associated protein tau may mediate amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) toxicity by modulating the tyrosine kinase Fyn. We showed previously that tau reduction prevents, and Fyn(More)
Autosomal dominant mutations of the RNA/DNA binding protein FUS are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS); however, it is not clear how FUS mutations cause neurodegeneration. Using transgenic mice expressing a common FALS-associated FUS mutation (FUS-R521C mice), we found that mutant FUS proteins formed a stable complex with WT FUS(More)
BACKGROUND In preclinical studies, davunetide promoted microtubule stability and reduced tau phosphorylation. Because progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is linked to tau pathology, davunetide could be a treatment for PSP. We assessed the safety and efficacy of davunetide in patients with PSP. METHODS In a double-blind, parallel group, phase 2/3 trial,(More)