Erica Soler-Hampejsek

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Most investigations of the importance of and the determinants of adult cognitive skills assume that (a) they are produced primarily by schooling and (b) schooling is statistically predetermined. But these assumptions may lead to misleading inferences about impacts of schooling and of pre-schooling and post-schooling experiences on adult cognitive skills.(More)
CONTEXT Social desirability bias is problematic in studies that rely on self-reported sexual behavior data. Where gender norms create different expectations about socially acceptable behavior, males and females face distinct pressures in reporting certain outcomes, which can distort assessments of risk for HIV and STIs. METHODS In 2009, relationship and(More)
Most empirical investigations of the effects of cognitive skills assume that they are produced by schooling. Drawing on longitudinal data to estimate production functions for adult verbal and nonverbal cognitive skills, we find that: (1) School attainment has a significant and substantial effect on adult verbal cognitive skills but not on adult nonverbal(More)
BACKGROUND Many adolescent girls in Kenya and elsewhere face considerable risks and vulnerabilities that affect their well-being and hinder a safe, healthy, and productive transition into early adulthood. Early adolescence provides a critical window of opportunity to intervene at a time when girls are experiencing many challenges, but before those(More)
Most empirical investigations of the effects of cognitive skills assume that they are produced by schooling, and that schooling is exogenous. Drawing on a rich longitudinal data set to estimate production functions for adult reading-comprehension cognitive skills and adult nonverbal cognitive skills, we find that (1) Schooling attainment has a significant(More)
p r o m o t i n g h e a l t h y, safe, and productive transitions to adulthood E ducation, particularly at the primary level, has long been regarded as an essential input of social and economic development. In addition to its direct role in increasing the cognitive abilities of students, schooling is recognized as a facilitator of labor force participation,(More)
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