Erica P. Homan

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Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and posttranslational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal dominant OI is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Bruck syndrome is a recessive disorder featuring(More)
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a spectrum of genetic disorders characterized by bone fragility. It is caused by dominant mutations affecting the synthesis and/or structure of type I procollagen or by recessively inherited mutations in genes responsible for the posttranslational processing/trafficking of type I procollagen. Recessive OI type VI is unique(More)
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited brittle bone disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. Loss of function mutations in FK506-binding protein 10 (FKBP10), encoding the FKBP65 protein, result in recessive OI and Bruck syndrome, of which the latter is additionally characterized by joint contractures. FKBP65 is thought to act as a(More)
Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1) were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB), form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I) chain (Pro986) and has(More)
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder, in both a dominant and recessive manner, of connective tissue characterized by brittle bones, fractures and extraskeletal manifestations. How structural mutations of type I collagen (dominant OI) or of its post-translational modification machinery (recessive OI) can cause abnormal quality and quantity of(More)
Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by low bone mass, poor bone quality, and fractures. Standard treatment for OI patients is limited to bisphosphonates, which only incompletely correct the bone phenotype, and seem to be less effective in adults. Sclerostin-neutralizing antibodies (Scl-Ab) have been shown to be beneficial in animal models of(More)
Mutations in CRTAP (coding for cartilage-associated protein), LEPRE1 (coding for prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 [P3H1]) or PPIB (coding for Cyclophilin B [CYPB]) cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta and loss or decrease of type I collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation. A comprehensive analysis of the phenotype of the Crtap-/- mice revealed multiple(More)
Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue characterized by brittle bones, fractures and extraskeletal manifestations1. How structural mutations of type I collagen (dominant OI) or of its post-translational modification machinery (recessive OI) can cause abnormal quality and quantity of bone is poorly understood. Notably, the(More)
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