Eric R. Wagner

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Miller-Fisher syndrome is an autoimmune neuropathy characterized by ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia, and in the majority of cases the presence of high titres of anti-GQ1b ganglioside antibodies. In an ex vivo model, human and mouse anti-GQ1b antibodies have been shown previously to induce a complement-dependent alpha-latrotoxin-like effect on the(More)
Guillain-Barré syndrome and its variant, Miller-Fisher syndrome, are acute, postinfectious, autoimmune neuropathies that frequently follow Campylobacter jejuni enteritis. The pathogenesis is believed to involve molecular mimicry between sialylated epitopes on C. jejuni LPSs and neural gangliosides. More than 90% of Miller-Fisher syndrome cases have serum(More)
One specialization of vertebrate presynaptic neuronal membranes is their multifold enrichment in complex gangliosides, suggesting that these sialoglycolipids may play a major functional role in synaptic transmission. We tested this hypothesis directly by studying neuromuscular synapses of mice lacking complex gangliosides attributable to deletion of the(More)
Anti-GD1a ganglioside antibodies (Abs) are the serological hallmark of the acute motor axonal form of the post-infectious paralysis, Guillain-Barre syndrome. Development of a disease model in mice has been impeded by the weak immunogenicity of gangliosides and the apparent resistance of GD1a-containing neural membranes to anti-GD1a antibody-mediated injury.(More)
Guillain-Barré syndrome following Campylobacter jejuni infection is frequently associated with anti-ganglioside autoantibodies mediated by molecular mimicry with ganglioside-like oligosaccharides on bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The regulation of antibody responses to these T-cell-independent antigens is poorly understood, and only a minority of(More)
Myoblast transplantation has been considered a potential treatment for some muscular disorders. It has proven very successful, however, only in immunodeficient or immunosuppressed mice. In this study, myoblasts from C57BL10J +/+ mice were transplanted, with no immunosuppressive treatment, in the tibialis anterior of fully histocompatible but(More)
A large body of clinical and experimental data indicate that complement activation is an important mechanism for neuronal and glial injury in Guillain-Barré syndromes. Inhibition of complement activation therefore might be expected to limit the progression of the disease. Using in vitro and in vivo models of the Guillain-Barré syndrome variant, Miller(More)
The role of natural killer (NK) cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and in the control of neonatal infections is not yet clear. Donor-versus-recipient NK cell alloreactivity was found to improve outcome in some settings of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that the role of NK cells in cord blood (CB) transplantation and(More)
The complement system is an essential component of innate immunity that has been more recently recognized as an unexpected player in various pathological states. These include age-related macular degeneration, atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome, allergy, foetal loss, and axonal and myelin degradation after trauma. Its importance has also been recognized(More)
C1 inhibitor deficiency (hereditary angioedema [HAE]) is a rare disorder for which there is a lack of consensus concerning diagnosis, therapy, and management, particularly in Canada. European initiatives have driven the approach to managing HAE with 3 C1-INH Deficiency Workshops held every 2 years in Hungary starting in 1999, with the third Workshop having(More)