Eric H. S. Lee

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As a software system evolves, its architecture will drift. System changes are often done without considering their effects on the system structure. These changes often introduce structural anomalies between the concrete (as-built) and the conceptual (as-designed) architecture which can impede program understanding. The problem of architectural drift is(More)
As large systems evolve, their architectural integrity tends to decay. Reverse engineering tools, such as PBS [7, 19], Rigi [15], and Acacia [5], can be used to acquire an understanding of a system’s “as-built” architecture and in so doing regain control over the system. A problem that has impeded the widespread adoption of reverse engineering tools is the(More)
As a software system evolves, its architecture will drift. System changes are often done without considering their e ects on the system structure. Consequently, the concrete (as-built) architecture becomes convoluted over time making continuing development and maintenance activities increasingly di cult and highly error prone. This problem of architectural(More)
Software systems must evolve during their lifetime in response to changing expectations and environments. As the software evolves, the system becomes harder to understand and maintain without the proper knowledge about how the system had changed in the past and the context of those changes. Studying software evolution has been extraordinarily costly and(More)
BACKGROUND Chlorate poisoning as a cause of methemoglobinemia is regarded in current literature to be resistant to treatment by methylene blue due to the oxidizing and denaturing properties of the chlorate anion, and often leads to severe renal and hematological complications with a high mortality rate. Recent case studies suggest practitioners have(More)
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