Eric G Chapman

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BACKGROUND Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is an atypical system of animal mtDNA inheritance found only in some bivalves. Under DUI, maternally (F genome) and paternally (M genome) transmitted mtDNAs yield two distinct gender-associated mtDNA lineages. The oldest distinct M and F genomes are found in freshwater mussels (order Unionoida). Comparative(More)
BACKGROUND Freshwater unionoidean bivalves, and species representing two marine bivalve orders (Mytiloida and Veneroida), exhibit a mode of mtDNA inheritance involving distinct maternal (F) and paternal (M) transmission routes concomitant with highly divergent gender-associated mtDNA genomes. Additionally, male unionoidean bivalves have a approximately 550(More)
Transitions in habitats and feeding behaviors were fundamental to the diversification of life on Earth. There is ongoing debate regarding the typical directionality of transitions between aquatic and terrestrial habitats and the mechanisms responsible for the preponderance of terrestrial to aquatic transitions. Snail-killing flies (Diptera: Sciomyzidae)(More)
In this study, we sequenced one nuclear and three mitochondrial DNA loci to construct a robust estimate of phylogeny for all available species of Tetanocera. Character optimizations suggested that aquatic habitat was the ancestral condition for Tetanocera larvae, and that there were at least three parallel transitions to terrestrial habitat, with one(More)
A major goal of gut-content analysis is to quantify predation rates by predators in the field, which could provide insights into the mechanisms behind ecosystem structure and function, as well as quantification of ecosystem services provided. However, percentage-positive results from molecular assays are strongly influenced by factors other than predation(More)
DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or(More)
The New World species of the genus Cremnops are revised. Thirty-three species of Cremnops are treated; five are described as new, i.e., C. bertae sp. nov., C. cluttsis sp. nov., C. nymphius sp. nov., C. wileycoyotius sp. nov. and C. witkopegasus sp. nov. Six species are synonymized, i.e., Cremnops caribensis Berta, 1998, is synonymized under C. guanicanus(More)
  • W J Shaw, J P Rishel, W Wang, Y Xie, F C Rutz, T E Seiple +2 others
  • 2007
DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or(More)
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