Eric Chapman

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Understanding smolt migration dynamics is a critical step in the preservation and conservation of imperiled salmonids in California’s Sacramento River system. Late-fall run Chinook salmon yearling smolts were acoustically tagged and tracked during their outmigration through California’s Sacramento River and San Francisco Estuary during 2007–2009. Migration(More)
Acoustic and geolocating archival tags were deployed on steelhead kelts to study their post-spawning migrations, diving behavior and thermal habitat. Fourteen reconditioned steelhead kelts were surgically implanted with LAT2510 archival and V7-2 L acoustic tags, and released from Coleman National Fish Hatchery. An array of acoustic receivers in the(More)
We used ultrasonic telemetry to describe the movement patterns of late-fall run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) smolts during their entire emigration down California’s Sacramento River, through the San Francisco Bay Estuary and into the Pacific Ocean. Yearling hatchery smolts were tagged via intracoelomic surgical(More)
Steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, are known to expel acoustic tags which can negatively bias population survival estimates. Tag burden may also affect the development and behavior of smolts, thereby impacting the results of population and behavioral studies. We monitored the growth, condition, and tag expulsion rate of steelhead trout in similar-sized(More)
The release of hatchery reared salmonid smolts is a common management tool aimed at enhancing depleted wild stocks and maintaining fisheries throughout Northern California and the Pacific Northwest. In the Sacramento River watershed, smolts must migrate through the river, delta and estuary in order to successfully reach the Pacific Ocean. Migration success(More)
One thousand late-fall run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) hatchery reared smolts were fitted with ultrasonic coded tags over a two-year period (in 2009 and 2010) and released in the Sacramento River. We tracked their outmigration movements from Benicia Bridge to the Golden Gate. Smolts transited the Bay rapidly in 2 to 4 days, yet also made(More)
Recent worldwide declines and extinctions of amphibian populations have been attributed to chytridiomycosis, a disease caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Until recently, Bd was thought to be the only Batrachochytrium species that infects amphibians; however a newly described species, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bs),(More)