Learn More
Encapsulation of drugs within nanocarriers that selectively target malignant cells promises to mitigate side effects of conventional chemotherapy and to enable delivery of the unique drug combinations needed for personalized medicine. To realize this potential, however, targeted nanocarriers must simultaneously overcome multiple challenges, including(More)
It is postulated that in addition to cell density, other factors such as the dimensions and diffusional characteristics of the environment could influence quorum sensing (QS) and induction of genetic reprogramming. Modeling studies predict that QS may operate at the level of a single cell, but, owing to experimental challenges, the potential benefits of QS(More)
Virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2 possess numerous features that make them well-suited for use in targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents. MS2 VLPs can be rapidly produced in large quantities using in vivo or in vitro synthesis techniques. Their capsids can be modified in precise locations via genetic insertion or chemical(More)
The study of ordered mesoporous silica materials has exploded since their discovery by Mobil researchers 20 years ago. The ability to make uniformly sized, porous, and dispersible nanoparticles using colloidal chemistry and evaporation-induced self-assembly has led to many applications of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) as "nanocarriers" for(More)
Mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers, or "protocells", exhibit a high loading capacity, enhanced colloidal stability, and peptide-directed, cell-specific uptake, making them especially well-suited for targeted delivery of protein toxins to cancer. Protocells loaded with ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) and targeted to hepatocellular carcinoma(More)
The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid(More)
Amphiphilic phospholipids were used to direct the formation of biocompatible, uniform silica nanostructures in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and bacterial cell lines. The cell surfaces organize multilayered phospholipid vesicles that interface coherently with the silica host and help relieve drying stresses that develop with conventional(More)
A quantitative understanding of the advantages of nanoparticle-based drug delivery vis-à-vis conventional free drug chemotherapy has yet to be established for cancer or other diseases despite numerous investigations. Here, we employ first-principles cell biophysics, drug pharmaco-kinetics, and drug pharmaco-dynamics to model the delivery of doxorubicin(More)
When lipid-directed assembly of silicic acid precursors is conducted in the presence of living cells, the cells intervene, surrounding themselves with a fluid, multilayered lipid vesicle that interfaces coherently with an ordered silica mesophase. This bio/nano interface is unique in that its uniform nanostructure prevents excessive drying of water,(More)
The combination of nanoparticle (NP) size, charge, and surface chemistry (e.g., extent of modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG)) is accepted as a key determinant of NP/cellular interactions. However, the influence of spatial arrangement and accessibility of the charged molecules on the NP surface vis-à-vis the average surface charge (zeta (ζ)(More)