Emmanuel E. Comoy

Learn More
BACKGROUND The unique resistance of prions to classic methods of decontamination, and evidence that prion diseases can be transmitted iatrogenically by medical devices pose a serious infection control challenge to health-care facilities. In view of the widespread tissue distribution of the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent in human beings, new(More)
The uncertain extent of human exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)--which can lead to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)--is compounded by incomplete knowledge about the efficiency of oral infection and the magnitude of any bovine-to-human biological barrier to transmission. We therefore investigated oral transmission of BSE to non-human(More)
BACKGROUND Analysis of archived appendix samples reveals that one in 2000 individuals in the United Kingdom may carry the infectious prion protein associated with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), raising questions about the risk of transfusion transmission from apparently healthy carriers. Blood leukoreduction shows limited efficiency against(More)
Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is the only animal prion disease reputed to be zoonotic, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans and having guided protective measures for animal and human health against animal prion diseases. Recently, partial transmissions to humanized mice showed that the zoonotic potential of scrapie(More)
Misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) is the central feature of prion diseases. The conversion of the normal α-helical PrP(C) into a pathological β-enriched PrP(Sc) constitutes an early event in the infectious process. Several hypotheses, involving different regions of the protein, endeavor to delineate the structural mechanism underlying this change of(More)
The emergence of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease (vCJD) is considered a likely consequence of human dietary exposure to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) agent. More recently, secondary vCJD cases were identified in patients transfused with blood products prepared from apparently healthy donors who later went on to develop the disease. As there is no(More)
In most forms of prion diseases, blood is infectious, but detection by immunochemistry techniques of the only available marker of infection (the misfolded prion protein, PrPTSE) in blood remains elusive. We developed a novel method for the detection of PrPTSE in blood of prion-infected rodents based on the finding that PrPTSE is associated with plasma(More)
The prion protein (PrP) is highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that it plays an important physiological function. However, despite decades of investigation, this role remains elusive. Here, by using animal and cellular models, we unveil a key role of PrP in the DNA damage response. Exposure of neurons to a genotoxic stress activates PRNP(More)