Emily Lane

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The cheetah is capable of a top speed of 29 ms(-1) compared to the maximum speed of 17 ms(-1) achieved by the racing greyhound. In this study of the hindlimb and in the accompanying paper on the forelimb we have quantified the musculoskeletal anatomy of the cheetah and greyhound and compared them to identify any differences that may account for this(More)
Despite the cheetah being the fastest living land mammal, we know remarkably little about how it attains such high top speeds (29 m s(-1)). Here we aim to describe and quantify the musculoskeletal anatomy of the cheetah forelimb and compare it to the racing greyhound, an animal of similar mass, but which can only attain a top speed of 17 m s(-1).(More)
the World Health Organization standard tourniquet test and a modifi ed tourniquet test in the diagnosis of dengue infec-sakorn S, et al. Causes of acute, undifferen-tiated, febrile illness in rural Thailand: results of a prospective observational study. To the Editor: Emergence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in wildlife in southern Africa has implications not(More)
During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects,(More)
This paper investigates demodulation of diieren-tially phase modulated signals DPMS using optimal HMM lters. The optimal HMM lter presented in the paper is computationally of order N 3 per time instant, where N is the number of message symbols. Previously, optimal HMM lters have been of computational order N 4 per time instant. Also, suboptimal HMM lters(More)
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