Emily Haisley

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In two experiments conducted with low-income participants, we find that individuals are more likely to buy state lottery tickets when they make several purchase decisions one-at-a-time, i.e. myopically, than when they make one decision about how many tickets to purchase. These results extend earlier findings showing that “broad bracketing” of decisions(More)
PURPOSE The biggest challenge for corporate wellness initiatives is low rates of employee participation. We test whether a behavioral economic approach to incentive design (i.e., a lottery) is more effective than a direct economic payment of equivalent monetary value (i.e., a grocery gift certificate) in encouraging employees to complete health risk(More)
................................................................................................... We review methodological issues that arise in designing, implementing and evaluating the efficacy of 'light' paternalistic policies. In contrast to traditional 'heavy-handed' approaches to paternalism, light paternalistic policies aim to enhance individual(More)
The impact of gifts on deposit balances and customer satisfaction was examined in a longitudinal field experiment conducted at a commercial bank. Gifts increased deposit balances, survey response rates, and customer satisfaction compared to the no-gift control. Several factors were manipulated within the gift treatment: gift type, the accompanying message,(More)
Financial professionals have a great deal of discretion concerning how to relay information about the risk of financial products to their clients. This paper examines how different risk presentation modes influence how well investors understand the risk-return profile of financial products and how much risk they are willing to accept. We analyze four(More)
Playing the state lottery is clearly inconsistent with expected value maximization; lotteries only return approximately 50 cents on the dollar, on average. Moreover, low-income individuals spend a higher percentage of their income, and possibly even a higher absolute amount, on lottery tickets than do wealthier individuals. However, little research has(More)
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