Emily E Stackpole

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Loss of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and autism. Although the functions of FMRP and its homologs FXR1P and FXR2P are well studied in the somatodendritic domain, recent evidence suggests that this family of RNA binding proteins also plays a role in the(More)
Fragile X syndrome, the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, is caused by loss of function of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA binding protein that regulates local protein synthesis in the somatodendritic compartment. However, emerging evidence also indicates important roles for FMRP in axonal and(More)
Local mRNA translation in growing axons allows for rapid and precise regulation of protein expression in response to extrinsic stimuli. However, the role of local translation in mature CNS axons is unknown. Such a mechanism requires the presence of translational machinery and associated mRNAs in circuit-integrated brain axons. Here we use a combination of(More)
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and is characterized by cognitive impairments and altered sensory function. It is caused by absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein essential for normal synaptic plasticity and function. Animal models have provided important insights(More)
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