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Micro- and nanorobots operating in low Reynolds number fluid environments require specialized swimming strategies for efficient locomotion. Prior research has focused on designs mimicking the rotary corkscrew motion of bacterial flagella or the planar beating motion of eukaryotic flagella. These biologically inspired designs are typically of uniform(More)
One of the most efficient actuation methods of robotic microswimmers for biomedical applications is by applying time-varying external magnetic fields. In order to improve the design of the swimmer and optimize its performance, one needs to develop simple theoretical models that enable explicit analysis of the swimmer's dynamics. This paper studies the(More)
Robotic locomotion typically involves using gaits-periodic changes of kinematic shape, which induce net motion of the body in a desired direction. An example is robotic microswimmers, which are inspired by motion of swimming microorganisms. One of the most famous theoretical models of a microswimmer is Purcell's planar three-link swimmer, whose structure(More)
One of the promising capabilities of magnetic microswimmers is towing a cargo, which can be used for targeted drug delivery or performing tissue biopsy. A key question is what should be the optimal size ratio between the cargo and the swimmer's flexible tail. This question is addressed here for the simplest theoretical model of a magnetic microswimmer(More)
Different devices are seen on chest roentgenograms everyday. The gamut of metallic density shadows include sutures, surgical clips, staples, cardiac valve prosthesis, wires, and plates. Tubes and catheters are recognized when metallic wires or barium are incorporated in their walls. The number of devices is ever growing and with them complications grow. The(More)
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