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BACKGROUND Radioactive radon is an inert gas that can migrate from soils and rocks and accumulate in enclosed areas, such as homes and underground mines. Studies of miners show that exposure to radon decay products causes lung cancer. Consequently, it is of public health interest to estimate accurately the consequences of daily, low-level exposure in homes(More)
Recent models for radon-induced lung cancer assume that at high levels of cumulative exposure, as experienced historically by many underground miners of uranium and other ores, the risk of lung cancer follows an inverse dose-rate (protraction enhancement) pattern. That is, for equal total dose, a greater risk is incurred by those whose total dose is(More)
Results are reported of epidemiological studies in six groups of miners, who work in U mines, Fe mines and shale clay mines. A significant excess of lung cancer was proved in exposure categories below 50 WLM, the first significant excess of lung cancer rate was found in the sixth year following the start of exposure, and a significant difference between the(More)
Recent observations have suggested that radon in the ambient air may cause cancers at sites other than the lung, but the evidence is indirect. We have studied site-specific cancer mortality in 4320 uranium miners in West Bohemia who have been followed-up for an average of 25 years, and in whom a four-fold radon-related excess of lung cancer has already been(More)
Epidemiological evidence of lung cancer risk from radon is based mainly on studies of men employed underground in mines where exposures are relatively high in comparison to indoor exposure. Risk from residential radon can be estimated from occupational studies. Nevertheless, as such extrapolations depend on a number of assumptions, direct estimation of the(More)
Epidemiological evidence of lung cancer risk from radon is based mainly on studies of men employed underground in mines where exposures are relatively high in comparison to indoor exposure. Nevertheless, direct evidence of risk from residential radon is desirable. In 1990, a study was started comprising 12,000 inhabitants of an area with elevated radon(More)
Six different polyglycolide and poly(-L-lactide) rods were tested biomechanically: native, in vitro and in vivo. They were Biofix-C and Biofix-CG rods and 4 poly(-L-lactide) rods with a molecular weight between 70,000 and 700,000. Their flexual strength and elasticity module were determined by the 3-point flexion test. A total of 70 pins were implanted in(More)
Some recent estimates of lung cancer risk from exposure to radon progeny in homes have been based on models developed from a pooled analysis of 11 cohorts of underground miners exposed to radon. While some miners were exposed to over 10,000 working level months (WLM), mean exposure among exposed miners was 162 WLM, about 10 times the exposure from lifetime(More)
Lung cancer mortality in a cohort of 4320 miners first employed during 1948-1959 at the Jáchymov and Horní Slavkov uranium mines in West Bohemia and followed until 1 January 1991 has been studied to gain a greater understanding of the consequences of exposure to radon and its progeny. Among men whose exposure rates never exceeded 10 working levels, excess(More)