Elizabeth Tyler Crone

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INTRODUCTION Women living with HIV are vulnerable to gender-based violence (GBV) before and after diagnosis, in multiple settings. This study's aim was to explore how GBV is experienced by women living with HIV, how this affects women's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and human rights (HR), and the implications for policymakers. METHODS A(More)
The global HIV and AIDS epidemics disproportionately affect women, particularly young women in southern and eastern Africa. UNAIDS, amongst other actors, has singled out National Strategic Plans for HIV and AIDS (NSPs) as a critical platform for ensuring that women and girls are meaningfully included in national HIV and AIDS responses. Despite this, there(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine the sexual and reproductive health priorities of women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to allow the values and preferences of such women to be considered in the development of new guidelines. METHODS A core team created a global reference group of 14 women living with HIV and together they developed a global(More)
INTRODUCTION Women living with HIV experience a disproportionate burden of mental health issues. To date, global guidelines contain insufficient guidance on mental health support, particularly regarding perinatal care. The aim of this article is to describe the extent and impact of mental health issues as experienced by women living with HIV on their sexual(More)
Gender-based violence (GBV) is a significant human rights violation and a key driver of the HIV epidemic in southern and eastern Africa. We frame GBV from a broad human rights approach that includes intimate partner violence and structural violence. We use this broader definition to review how National Strategic Plans for HIV and AIDS (NSPs) in southern and(More)
End-user involvement in HIV guidelines development is often little, late or absent. Other disciplines have long advocated 'handing over the stick' (i.e. power and control), as both ethical and strategic. Women HIV activists have called this respectful engagement with, and learning from, communities 'MIWA' (meaningful involvement of women living with HIV and(More)
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