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Copyright and Reprint Permissions: Abstracting is permitted with credit to the source. Libraries may photocopy beyond the limits of US copyright law, for private use of patrons, those articles in this volume that carry a code at the bottom of the first page, provided that the per-copy fee indicated in the code is paid through the The papers in this book(More)
This session reports on a workshop convened by the ACM Education Board with funding by the US National Science Foundation and invites discussion from the community on the workshop findings. The topic, curricular directions for cybersecurity, is one that resonates in many departments considering how best to prepare graduates to face the challenges of(More)
The 2011 ITiCSE working group on information assurance (IA) education examined undergraduate curricula at the two- and four-year levels, both within and outside the United States (US). A broad set of two-year IA degree programs were examined in order to get a sense of similarities and differences between them. A broad set of four-year IA degree programs(More)
Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United States Department of Homeland Security or the United States Department of Defense. This material has been approved for public release and unlimited distribution except as restricted below.(More)
Information assurance and information security are serious worldwide concerns. Computer security is one of the three new focal areas of the ACM/IEEE's Computer Science Curriculum update in 2008. This ACM/IEEE report describes, as the first of its three recent trends, "the emergence of security as a major area of concern." [3] The purpose of this working(More)
Information Assurance and computer security are serious worldwide concerns of governments, industry, and academia. Computer security is one of the three new focal areas of the ACM/IEEE's Computer Science Curriculum update in 2008. This ACM/IEEE report describes, as the first of its three recent trends, "the emergence of security as a major area of concern."(More)