Elizabeth A. Winzeler

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Determining the effect of gene deletion is a fundamental approach to understanding gene function. Conventional genetic screens exhibit biases, and genes contributing to a phenotype are often missed. We systematically constructed a nearly complete collection of gene-deletion mutants (96% of annotated open reading frames, or ORFs) of the yeast Saccharomyces(More)
The completion of the genome sequence for Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for most malaria human deaths, has the potential to reveal hundreds of new drug targets and proteins involved in pathogenesis. However, only approximately 35% of the genes code for proteins with an identifiable function. The absence of routine genetic tools for studying(More)
MOTIVATION With the emergence of genome-wide expression profiling data sets, the guilt by association (GBA) principle has been a cornerstone for deriving gene functional interpretations in silico. Given the limited success of traditional methods for producing clusters of genes with great amounts of functional similarity, new data-mining algorithms are(More)
  • Neekesh V Dharia, Amar Bir Singh Sidhu, María Belén Cassera, Scott J Westenberger, Selina ER Bopp, Rich T Eastman +8 others
  • 2009
BACKGROUND The identification of genetic changes that confer drug resistance or other phenotypic changes in pathogens can help optimize treatment strategies, support the development of new therapeutic agents, and provide information about the likely function of genes. Elucidating mechanisms of phenotypic drug resistance can also assist in identifying the(More)
A fundamental problem in systems biology and whole genome sequence analysis is how to infer functions for the many uncharacterized proteins that are identified, whether they are conserved across organisms of different phyla or are phylum-specific. This problem is especially acute in pathogens, such as malaria parasites, where genetic and biochemical(More)
Malaria parasites elude eradication attempts both within the human host and across nations. At the individual level, parasites evade the host immune responses through antigenic variation. At the global level, parasites escape drug pressure through single nucleotide variants and gene copy amplification events conferring drug resistance. Despite their(More)
  • A Taylor Bright, Ryan Tewhey, Shira Abeles, Raul Chuquiyauri, Alejandro Llanos-Cuentas, Marcelo U Ferreira +3 others
  • 2012
Malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax is an experimentally neglected severe disease with a substantial burden on human health. Because of technical limitations, little is known about the biology of this important human pathogen. Whole genome analysis methods on patient-derived material are thus likely to have a substantial impact on our understanding of P.(More)
The sexual stages of malarial parasites are essential for the mosquito transmission of the disease and therefore are the focus of transmission-blocking drug and vaccine development. In order to better understand genes important to the sexual development process, the transcriptomes of high-purity stage I-V Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes were(More)
Discovering novel genes involved in immune evasion and drug resistance in the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is of critical importance to global health. Such knowledge may assist in the development of new effective vaccines and in the appropriate use of antimalarial drugs. By performing a full-genome scan of allelic variability in 14 field(More)