Elizabeth A. Rapley

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Familial cylindromatosis is an autosomal dominant genetic predisposition to multiple tumours of the skin appendages. The susceptibility gene (CYLD) has previously been localized to chromosome 16q and has the genetic attributes of a tumour-suppressor gene (recessive oncogene). Here we have identified CYLD by detecting germline mutations in 21 cylindromatosis(More)
We conducted a genome-wide association study for testicular germ cell tumor, genotyping 298,782 SNPs in 979 affected individuals and 4,947 controls from the UK and replicating associations in a further 664 cases and 3,456 controls. We identified three new susceptibility loci, two of which include genes that are involved in telomere regulation. We identified(More)
Testicular microlithiasis (TM) is characterised by small intratesticular calcifications, which can be visualised by ultrasound. Men with testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) have a higher frequency of TM than men without TGCT. To clarify the association between TGCT and TM and to investigate the relationship between TGCT susceptibility and TM, we recruited(More)
Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common cancer in young men. Despite a considerable familial component to TGCT risk, no genetic change that confers increased risk has been substantiated to date. The human Y chromosome carries a number of genes specifically involved in male germ cell development, and deletion of the AZFc region at Yq11 is the(More)
Mutations in known breast cancer susceptibility genes account for a minority of the familial aggregation of the disease. To search for further breast cancer susceptibility genes, we performed a combined analysis of four genome-wide linkage screens, which included a total of 149 multiple case breast cancer families. All families included at least three cases(More)
A base substitution in the mouse Dnd1 gene resulting in a truncated Dnd protein has been shown to be responsible for germ cell loss and the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) in the 129 strain of mice. We investigated the human orthologue of this gene in 263 patients (165 with a family history of TGCT and 98 without) and found a rare(More)
Testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) affect 1 in 500 men and are the most common cancer in males aged 15-40 in Western European populations. The incidence of TGCT has risen dramatically over the last century. Known risk factors for TGCT include a history of undescended testis (UDT), testicular dysgenesis, infertility, previously diagnosed TGCT (ref. 7) and a(More)
Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) of adults and adolescents are putatively derived from primordial germ cells or gonocytes. Recently reported genome-wide association studies implicate six gene loci that predispose to TGCT development. Remarkably, the functions of proteins encoded by genes within these regions bridge our understanding between the pathways(More)
Testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) are the most common neoplasm in young men. Various studies have suggested the existence of an inherited predisposition to development of these tumours. Genome-wide screens subsequently provided evidence of a TGCT susceptibility gene on chromosome Xq27 (TGCT1) that might also predispose to cryptorchism. However, this(More)
Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is the most common cancer in young men and is notable for its high familial risks. So far, six loci associated with TGCT have been reported. From genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of 307,291 SNPs in 986 TGCT cases and 4,946 controls, we selected for follow-up 694 SNPs, which we genotyped in a further 1,064 TGCT(More)