Eliz Warwick

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Slime production by microorganisms in the rumen of cattle and sheep has been advanced as a possible factor in feed-lot bloat by Jacobson and Lindahl (1955), and for frothy legume bloat by Hungate et al. (1955). The slime serves to entrap the fermentation gases and the resulting frothy ingesta blocks the ruminant's gas eructation mechanism. Lindahl et al.(More)
Experiments were conducted to determine effects of 2 organic phosphate systemic insecticides on embryonic survival and possible teratogenesis in cattle. A total of 726 heifers at 3 locations were treated with either crufomate (4-tert-butyl-2-chlorophenyl methyl methylphos-phoramidate) or coumaphos (O,O-diethyl(More)
Phase II metabolising enzymes enable the metabolism and excretion of potentially harmful substances in adults, but to date it is unclear whether dietary phytochemicals can induce phase II enzymes differently between adults and infants. We investigated the expression of phase II enzymes in an in vitro model of primary skin fibroblasts at three different(More)
Washed suspensions of the ruminal ciliates, Isotricha prostoma and Entodinium simplex, concentrated C(14)-labeled oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids within the cells during short incubation periods. Radioautographs demonstrated that oleic acid-1-C(14) was hydrogenated to stearic acid by I. prostoma, and Warburg manometric data showed that the(More)
Tissue gain and efficiency and carcass characteristics of seventy-eight Angus steers were compared on three feed intake regimens and serially slaughtered at 6 months to 6 years. The regimens were: (A) continuous ad ad libitum feeding, (B) restricted to gain about 0.45 kg daily and (C) restricted as in B until 6 months before slaughter then fed ad libitum.(More)
Slime production by microorganisms in the rumen of cattle and sheep has been advanced as a possible factor in feed-lot bloat by Jacobson and Lindahl (1955), and for frothy legume bloat by Hungate et al. (1955). The slime serves to entrap the fermentation gases and the resulting frothy ingesta blocks the ruminant's gas eructation mechanism. Lindahl et al.(More)