Eleanor M. Riley

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The implementation and evaluation of malaria control programs would be greatly facilitated by new tools for the rapid assessment of malaria transmission intensity. Because acquisition and maintenance of antimalarial antibodies depend on exposure to malaria infection, such antibodies might be used as proxy measures of transmission intensity. We have compared(More)
IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine. During infection it inhibits the activity of Th1 cells, NK cells, and macrophages, all of which are required for optimal pathogen clearance but also contribute to tissue damage. In consequence, IL-10 can both impede pathogen clearance and ameliorate immunopathology. Many different types of cells can produce IL-10,(More)
To estimate the burden of malarial disease, and evaluate the likely effects of control strategies, requires reliable predictions of malaria transmission intensity. It has long been suggested that antimalarial antibody prevalences could provide a more accurate estimate of transmission intensity than traditional measures such as parasite prevalence or(More)
We report a genome-wide association (GWA) study of severe malaria in The Gambia. The initial GWA scan included 2,500 children genotyped on the Affymetrix 500K GeneChip, and a replication study included 3,400 children. We used this to examine the performance of GWA methods in Africa. We found considerable population stratification, and also that signals of(More)
Cerebral malaria is a life-threatening complication of malaria infection. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is poorly defined and progress in understanding the condition is severely hampered by the inability to study in detail, ante-mortem, the parasitological and immunological events within the brain that lead to the onset of clinical symptoms.(More)
CONTEXT There are concerns that malaria control measures such as use of insecticide-treated bed nets, by delaying acquisition of immunity, might result in an increase in the more severe manifestations of malaria. An understanding of the relationships among the level of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum, age, and severity of malaria can provide evidence of(More)
Understanding the regulation of immune responses is central for control of autoimmune and infectious disease. In murine models of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory disease, potent regulatory T lymphocytes have recently been characterized. Despite an explosion of interest in these cells, their relevance to human disease has been uncertain. In a(More)
MSP2 is a merozoite surface protein of Plasmodium falciparum and, as such, is a potential component of a malaria vaccine. In this study, we have used a panel of recombinant MSP2 antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to investigate the recognition of MSP2 by antibodies from malaria-immune human serum. These recombinant antigens include full-length(More)
Antibodies constitute a critical component of the naturally acquired immunity that develops following frequent exposure to malaria. However, specific antibody titres have been reported to decline rapidly in the absence of reinfection, supporting the widely perceived notion that malaria infections fail to induce durable immunological memory responses.(More)