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BACKGROUND Comparing related structures and viewing the structures in the context of sequence alignments are important tasks in protein structure-function research. While many programs exist for individual aspects of such work, there is a need for interactive visualization tools that: (a) provide a deep integration of sequence and structure, far beyond(More)
With an increasing interest in RNA therapeutics and for targeting RNA to treat disease, there is a need for the tools used in protein-based drug design, particularly DOCKing algorithms, to be extended or adapted for nucleic acids. Here, we have compiled a test set of RNA-ligand complexes to validate the ability of the DOCK suite of programs to successfully(More)
The study of mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies-collections of enzymes that perform different overall reactions but share both a common fold and a distinct mechanistic step performed by key conserved residues-helps elucidate the structure-function relationships of enzymes. We have developed a resource, the structure-function linkage database(More)
Hormones and sensory stimuli activate serpentine receptors, transmembrane switches that relay signals to heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). To understand the switch mechanism, we subjected 93 amino acids in transmembrane helices III, V, VI, and VII of the human chemoattractant C5a receptor to random saturation mutagenesis. A(More)
Although agonists are thought to occupy binding pockets within the seven-helix core of serpentine receptors, the topography of these binding pockets and the conformational changes responsible for receptor activation are poorly understood. To identify the ligand binding pocket in the receptor for complement factor 5a (C5aR), we assessed binding affinities of(More)
The Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD, http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/) is a manually curated classification resource describing structure-function relationships for functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies. Members of such superfamilies are diverse in their overall reactions yet share a common ancestor and some conserved active site features associated(More)
G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of seven-transmembrane-helix proteins that mediate responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and, in the case of rhodopsin, photons. The recent determination of the structure of rhodopsin at atomic resolution opens avenues to a deeper understanding of GPCR activation and transmembrane signaling. Data(More)
Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, and many studies have suggested that apoE has isoform-specific effects on the deposition or clearance of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides. We examined the effects of apoE isoforms on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and on Abeta production in rat neuroblastoma B103 cells(More)
Gene trapping is a method of generating murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines containing insertional mutations in known and novel genes. A number of international groups have used this approach to create sizeable public cell line repositories available to the scientific community for the generation of mutant mouse strains. The major gene trapping groups(More)
The seven transmembrane helices of serpentine receptors comprise a conserved switch that relays signals from extracellular stimuli to heterotrimeric G proteins on the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. By substituting histidines for residues at the cytoplasmic ends of helices III and VI in retinal rhodopsin, we engineered a metal-binding site whose occupancy(More)