Learn More
The Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC) performed a genome-wide association study of late-onset Alzheimer disease using a three-stage design consisting of a discovery stage (stage 1) and two replication stages (stages 2 and 3). Both joint analysis and meta-analysis approaches were used. We obtained genome-wide significant results at MS4A4A(More)
To identify novel causes of familial neurodegenerative diseases, we extended our previous studies of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies to investigate TDP-43 as a candidate gene in familial cases of motor neuron disease. Sequencing of the TDP-43 gene led to the identification of a novel missense mutation, Ala-315-Thr, which segregates with(More)
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a paralytic and usually fatal disorder caused by motor-neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord. Most cases of ALS are sporadic but about 5-10% are familial. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein (TARDBP, also known as TDP43) and fused in sarcoma (FUS, also known as translocated in(More)
OBJECTIVE Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a common, fatal motor neuron disorder with no effective treatment. Approximately 10% of cases are familial ALS (FALS), and the most common genetic abnormality is superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutations. Most ALS research in the past decade has focused on the neurotoxicity of mutant SOD1, and this knowledge(More)
The aim of this study was to improve the neuropathologic recognition and provide criteria for the pathological diagnosis in the neurodegenerative diseases grouped as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD); revised criteria are proposed. Recent advances in molecular genetics, biochemistry, and neuropathology of FTLD prompted the Midwest Consortium for(More)
We describe two extended haplotypes that cover the human tau gene. In a total of approximately 200 unrelated caucasian individuals there is complete disequilibrium between polymorphisms which span the gene (which covers approximately 100 kb of DNA). This suggests that the establishment of the two haplotypes was an ancient event and either that recombination(More)
One year ago, in this journal, we published a recommended nomenclature for the neuropathologic subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) [7]. A major impetus behind this was to resolve the confusion that had arisen around the use of the term ‘‘FTLD with ubiquitinated inclusions’’ (FTLD-U), following the discovery that the molecular pathology of(More)
The cognitive hallmark of early Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extraordinary inability to form new memories. For many years, this dementia was attributed to nerve-cell death induced by deposits of fibrillar amyloid beta (Abeta). A newer hypothesis has emerged, however, in which early memory loss is considered a synapse failure caused by soluble Abeta(More)
TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a major pathological protein of sporadic and familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTLD-U) with or without motor neuron disease (MND). Thus, TDP-43 defines a novel class of neurodegenerative diseases called TDP-43 proteinopathies. We performed ubiquitin and TDP-43(More)
We recommend a new term, “primary age-related tauopathy” (PART), to describe a pathology that is commonly observed in the brains of aged individuals. Many autopsy studies have reported brains with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) that are indistinguishable from those of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), in the absence of amyloid (Aβ) plaques. For these “NFT+/Aβ−”(More)